DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Surrender

By: on February 13, 2015

When a child is young, he or she has an innate “uh oh” feeling. Perhaps it seems innate, but it is actually learned. It is the feeling associated with fear, when something bad is going to happen. Perhaps it happens when we have when we have done something wrong. The “uh oh” alarm goes off:…

8 responses

Active Hope

By: on February 13, 2015

The dreadful multiple tragedies unfolding around the globe are truly overwhelming and too depressing to think about. The mainstream Western media play a major role in feeding our anxiety by skillfully focusing on the stories that often target certain religions, ethnicities, and/or races. People are becoming not only hopeless but also desensitized to the suffering…

8 responses

Active Hope – Active Participants

By: on February 13, 2015

There have been two times in my life that I have had an overwhelming feeling of hopelessness.  The first was the time after John’s death.  It was a very dark, dark time in my life.  I could barely breathe…I could barely live. The second time I had this feeling of hopelessness was when I worked…

6 responses

Be the witness!

By: on February 13, 2015

Macy and Johnstone’s book Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in without Going Crazy, is a relevant contribution to discussion of environmental sustainability and humanity’ on going quest peace and tranquility on earth. The search for meaning has led to interesting discoveries for some, but many people are also left with a sense…

5 responses

Our Finest Response IS Needed

By: on February 12, 2015

Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone describes “active hope” as a practice, something that we must do rather than have. Stating that this active hope is a process that can be applied to any new situation involving three steps: a clear view of reality, defining a clear direction that we would like things to move-in or…

5 responses

Feeling Disappointed

By: on February 12, 2015

When I began looking over Zygmunt Buaman’s Collateral Damage: Social Inequalities in a Global Age, I opened the pages with great anticipation. By the time I had finished, I found myself disappointed. Bauman offered some insightful thoughts on some key issues, but I felt he missed the mark on some others. Bauman did a good…

6 responses

The Disparity of Equality in a Socially Divided Age

By: on February 12, 2015

The Disparity of Equality in a Socially Divided Age!   February 10, 15   A very interesting book and I love some of the things Zygmunt Bauman brings out in Collateral Damage: Social Inequalities in a Global Age. I could have written a lot in this book because of having to experience it while growing…

18 responses

Contributing to one’s own Poverty and Exploitation

By: on February 12, 2015

Confession:  I just contributed to the “collateral damage” of which I am a part.  I bought my wife Valentine’s Day flowers from proflowers.com.  I am a horrible man.  I was listening to the radio and on came the commercial.  It was a special like no other.  If I ordered today, I would be able to…

11 responses

Haunted by unconditional responsibility

By: on February 12, 2015

Reading Collateral Damage by Zygmunt Bauman creates a tremendous argument for good biblically reflective public theology. In fact I would encourage a revision in the reading order for the next cohort, the trio of books on contextual theology would be a practical next step after reading Bauman; largely because this book cries out for God’s…

7 responses

Hoping in God

By: on February 12, 2015

I have to admit, the past few weeks have been tough. Opening a community café has been a greater challenge than I could ever have imagined. On Monday this past week, I caught myself in the midst of negatively, “I can’t do this…I can’t, I can’t.” Staffing problems, teething troubles with menus, opening hours, finding…

7 responses

The Starfish

By: on February 12, 2015

It would have been really easy to write this week’s blog about mission teams going into Haiti. Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy is made for Haiti. In a land that has been deforested beyond measure, where people have suffered for centuries, where the environment has been all but…

7 responses

The Human Condition

By: on February 12, 2015

As I was getting started into the intro and first chapter of this week’s reading, I thought to myself “Great, this will be easy!  I’ll just connect the dots between the ‘agora’ and ‘ecclesia’ and make this week’s post a ‘part 2’ of last week’s.  I should be able to really drive home my assertion…

18 responses

The Grand Narrative

By: on February 12, 2015

The stories being written in the world this week, can seem to be ones that tells of a declining mess. Perhaps nothing sharper than the disqualification of the U.S. Little League Champions from Chicago, for recruiting violations, speaks more to that fact than any other. A team of mostly, pre-pubescent children, put together through the…

15 responses

Three Tributaries

By: on February 12, 2015

Like Bauman’s Collateral Damage, I’m going to take “a series of tributaries”[1] that express some places where his book exposed me Tributary One I’ll be honest; I did not want to read this book. Just looking at the title and subtitle, I knew I would be overwhelmed by the problems of society. There seems to…

11 responses

There’s Enough To Go Around

By: on February 12, 2015

The other day my wife pulled out some cookies from the oven and laid them on the counter. Just a few minutes later my daughter jumped up on the counter, smelled the cookies, and then quickly managed to lick each one. I was in shock. When I asked her what in the world she was…

9 responses

Christian Thinkers vs. Thinking Christians

By: on February 10, 2015

As I read through Mark Noll’s, The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind, I was left with one thought… just one thought. The problem is not necessarily the lack of great Christian thinkers but the lack of everyday thinking Christians. I’m not sure when the church began to be divided between the clergy and the lay,…

no responses

Contextualization

By: on February 10, 2015

This weeks reading left me with more questions than answers. It left me excited about the future and skeptical about our willingness to step into that future. The idea of contextualization gave me a sense of awe as I think about how great God is and how little we, the people of God, actually understand.…

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Fully-immersed: The Contextuality of Contact

By: on February 9, 2015

“There is no such thing as ‘theology’; there is only contextual theology,”[1] writes Stephen Bevans in his Models of Contextual Theology. There are a number of critics that take him to task for this statement and also for limitations they see in his six (used to be five; Bevans made it six in the current…

2 responses

THE GOSPEL – CONTEXT AND CULTURE

By: on February 7, 2015

I recall a number of years ago, while preparing for a mission assignment, my wife and I attended a missionary training institute in Colorado. We attempted to prepare for the many situational experiences that awaited us in a country and culture that we knew very little about. I recall our discussions about “place, presence, participation”…

9 responses

Contextual Theology

By: on February 7, 2015

In Ethiopia, most non-believers associate Protestant Christianity with foreign aid, Americans or Israel, to segregate believers and disqualify the authenticity of Protestant Christianity. In my Arsi Oromo culture, becoming a believer is equal to denying the values and unity of the clan, because religion is more than just an individual affair. Religion is a shared…

13 responses