DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Toward Integration: Eating Our Collective Shadow

By: on September 9, 2021

I conducted my analytical reading of Steele on a flight from Portland, Oregon to Knoxville, Tennessee. His words were a primer for reentry into my hometown and back to the narratives and ideology I rarely hear first hand. I appreciate Steele’s historical perspective and the clarity and sarcasm he employs to make his case. I…

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Entitled to Shame?

By: on September 9, 2021

“Unclean! Unclean!”, the leper shouts while walking through a crowd, all the while ringing the bell to announce his passing to those within ear shot. What a compassionate construct for caring for the humanity of the sick.  Just kidding.  But it is a historical testament about how human beings passive aggressively hold to power through…

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I Was Born into White Privilege Between Selma and Birmingham

By: on September 9, 2021

Raised in Alabaster, Alabama, I spent the first six years of my life in between Selma and Birmingham. These two places that hold great significance in the fight for equal rights for Black Americans; Selma for the second march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in response to Bloody Sunday, hundreds marched from Montgomery in solidarity;…

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Quit Is A Four Letter Word

By: on September 6, 2021

School, particularly the skills of reading and writing have always been a struggle. Therefore a reflection of my academic journey has to start with a separation between academic skills and learning. While I found myself in pre-college days struggle to keep up, my college days were filled with extra courses to remediate and make up.…

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A Bag of Stones

By: on September 5, 2021

“Do not be afraid”, the Angels, and well more importantly, Jesus, proclaim over and over.  However, I am afraid; I’m afraid of reading too slow, of taking too much time on notes, and writing with an academic voice.  I wonder how I have made it this far academically with so many weaknesses. The truth is…

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A New Season for Thinking and Writing

By: on September 2, 2021

Our readings for this week have challenged and stretched my understanding of how to read, think, take notes, and write. Being high on the intuitive scale, it is often hard for me to write until I have a sense of inspiration or spark. Outlining my thoughts has always felt cumbersome and lackluster. Several insights from…

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Reading in Business and Academia

By: on September 2, 2021

Twelve years of primary education, four years of higher education, another four years of seminary education, and now I find myself in the second year of George Fox’s Doctoral program. My ability to read, take notes, and compose critical essays has indeed improved over this trajectory. It’s rewarding to see one’s intellectual growth. Progress is…

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Taking one step at a time

By: on September 2, 2021

I immigrated to America when I was ten years old from Korea. I still vividly remember the fear and anxiety of learning English as my second language. I think growing up, understanding and learning numbers came much more naturally than language arts. I read a lot in Korean when I was young before I moved…

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Packing Light for the Journey So Far

By: on September 2, 2021

My educational journey to this point included plenty of expectations regarding reading, taking notes, and writing essays. Reading always came easy to me, but I enjoyed reading what I liked while complying with what was assigned in school. From elementary school through high school, good memory recall allowed me to read posted material quickly and…

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Smart Enough to Recognize My Many Limitations

By: on September 2, 2021

Digging deeper into academia at the start of my bachelor’s studies was a tremendous learning curve since I never enjoyed reading in my adolescence. Therefore, up until my first year in college, the reading assigned to me was always done at the very last minute and not effectively. So, you can imagine my struggle to…

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The [Current] Starting Point

By: on September 1, 2021

Reading and writing have been emphasized in my life since a young age. I feel fortunate that both of my parents excel in these areas and were intentional with my development in them. My parents would reward me for reading a series of books with the corresponding doll and I remember playing typing games on…

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How Little I Know!

By: on September 1, 2021

Upon entering my second year of doctoral work, I feel the weight of how little I know when it comes to reading, note-taking, and writing! On the reading front, over the years, I have challenged myself to become what I would consider an avid reader. However, in better understanding the four levels of reading as…

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Learning to Read: A Romantic Comedy

By: on September 1, 2021

My relationship with reading began in Mrs. Owen’s second grade class at Russellville Elementary School in East Tennessee. When the reading period came around a few classmates and I filed ourselves outside and into portable classrooms. While the rest of our class tapped into the magical land of books I played remedial “video games” meant…

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הֲפִיכָה

By: on May 2, 2021

The experience of progressive thinking, considering philosophy, even, contemplative theology is new for me. For less than two decades, I have been on an adventure exploring truth (in all its wonderful variety). With the curiosity to learn, panic has arisen at times for there is just not enough time to passably explore-to-know the island I…

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The Language of a Movement

By: on April 26, 2021

The key to understanding any social movement is to understand the language used to spread its narrative. In his book, Explaining Postmodernism, Stephen R.C. Hicks argues that postmodernism has become the language of the political Left. He writes, “Many deconstruct reason, truth, and reality because they believe that in the name of reason, truth, and…

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Awakening to a New (Old) Way of Being Woke

By: on April 26, 2021

“Explaining Postmodernism” is written by a professor of philosophy and seeks to make sense of why today’s society finds it difficult, if not impossible, to handle complex questions and function in ambiguity using methods like logic, reason, and rules for debate instead of resorting to extremist activism and identity politics. Stephen Hicks argues that the…

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Endorsing and Critiquing Socialism: A Word of Caution

By: on April 26, 2021

In the opening pages of Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault, philosopher Stephen Hicks seeks to articulate his interpretation of what postmodernism is, what its philosophical roots are, and what, if anything, it seeks to achieve. Modernist philosophy, which emerged within the Enlightenment Period (Descartes, Newton, etc.), argued that the objective world…

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Convergence

By: on April 26, 2021

In the fall of 2019, I needed some space to breathe and be, so I went to the Portland Art Museum. The instillation, “All Things Being Equal,” by Hank Willis Thomas was on display. As I walked past Thomas’ photographs, prints, videos, quilts, and mixed-media two-dimensional (often) interactive works, I felt disoriented, forced to see…

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