DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Vols Parlar Català?

By: on May 17, 2014

This week in our D.Min program we were tasked with reading Josh Kaufman’s book The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything… Fast!  Kaufman’s book is basically a guide on how to break down skills into component parts and tackle the learning process in an organized and logical series of steps.  Kaufman greater and more…

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Typing at the Speed of Lite

By: on May 17, 2014

Can you learn anything in just 20 hours? This week I took on the challenge of working on my touch-typing. I have been reading the book The First 20 hours: How to Learn Anything Fast by Josh Kaufman. So can I improve my touch typing this week? I must admit I am not trying to expect…

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Land Mines and Hebrew

By: on May 17, 2014

In May of 2008 I was able to take my first tour of Israel, I was hooked.  From the biblical sites to the modern culture, I loved everything about traveling and experiencing the Middle East.  Not long into the trip I realized there was much to learn.  Culture, contexts, foods and most of all the…

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The Pool Boy

By: on May 17, 2014

I had every intention of taking this week’s D.Min assignment (to learn something new) and learning something  ‘exotic.’ Something that I had never done but that always intrigued me, something that would make me more of a renaissance man. I wanted to learn how to fly fish. Sadly though, a more necessary skill that needed…

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Tracking My Journey by Journaling

By: on May 17, 2014

When my cohort was tasked to read the book The First 20 Hours by Josh Kaufman, I figured we would read the book and then blog about it; this has been the customary approach to the reading assignments. However, Dr. Clark pulled a “switcheroo” and the assignment was changed to actually follow the book’s directions,…

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Can you learn anything in 20 hours?

By: on May 15, 2014

Naturally I first accessed my bucket list to accomplish something that has eluded me in the past.  I play guitar and have always wanted to learn to play banjo (aka: Cliff Berger method)but after sending out requests via Facebook, I was unable to acquire a borrowed banjo and It would stretch me to buy one…

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It’s Rough Out There

By: on May 10, 2014

They got Charles Darwin trapped out there on Highway 5 Judge says to the High Sheriff, “I want them dead or alive” Either one, I don’t care, high water everywhere -Bob Dylan, High Water History is fascinating stuff.  Often it gets short shrift from poor high school teachers more focused on the memorization of facts…

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Farmville, guinea pigs and coffee

By: on May 9, 2014

Why were some civilization able to create a hegemony status for themselves and why did others fail and were only able to play a subordinate role? This and other questions are discussed in the book “Guns Germs and Steel – The Fates of Human Societies“ by Pulitzer prize winner Jared Diamonds. One of the traces,…

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Rice Cake Pudding and Jello

By: on May 9, 2014

Shortly after my college days I interviewed and was hired at a church roughly two hours from where I grew up.  When I originally heard of the open position and the town it was located in, I remember thinking, “I’ve never heard of this place.”  In my first attempt to visit this large town/small city,…

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Varying Passions for Technology

By: on May 9, 2014

When I was a child, my family did not own a car. Getting around was a chore that we often experienced, yet resolve came in various forms, such as family friends with cars, city buses, and taxis. Such modes of transportation made it easier for my family to acquire basic needs like food, clothes, and shelter by…

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Is it the location, location or location?

By: on May 8, 2014

For one year I studied Human Geography in a Master’s program at the University of Kansas.  I was home for a year’s furlough from mission service in Brazil and was encouraged to study but ran out of money so never completed the degree.  However, while at KU, I was exposed to Environmental Determinism, a precursor…

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The Great Leap Forward for Man: Man Made or God Made?

By: on May 8, 2014

Jared Diamond in in his book Guns, Germs and Steel attempts to answer the question why some societies advanced much quicker than others throughout history. He tracks the history of man 4 million years ago in Africa and 1.8 million years ago in a Southeast Asian Island in Java to the oldest fossils discovered of…

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Future Shock

By: on May 8, 2014

Whether it concerns an individual, or a family, communities or nations, the most pressing question for humanity is this: What does the future hold?  Then, the most frequently asked questions are:  Where do we go from here? Where are we headed to? How do we get to where we desire to be?  It isn’t very…

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Why do the nations rage?

By: on May 8, 2014

Quite a few years ago I accompanied a group from the church I was working for on a missions trip to Ensenada. We passed through beautiful San Diego with palm trees, green foliage and modern buildings. Then as we passed over the border into Mexico everything changed. The ground was brown and barren. There were…

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How Did We Get Here from There?

By: on May 7, 2014

          Jared Diamond’s book, Germs, Guns and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, is his attempt to answer the question, “Why did history unfold differently on different continents?”*  I found the book to be well written, easily understood, and well researched.  Diamond writes with a breadth of knowledge and global travel…

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“The Story”

By: on May 7, 2014

In “Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies,” professor of physiology, Jared Diamond, asks the question, “How, though, did the world get to be the way it was in A.D. 1500?” To rephrase the question …”…why did human development proceed at such different rates on different continents?  Those disparate rates constitute history’s broadest…

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Guns, Germs and Steel – what now?

By: on May 7, 2014

Guns, Germs and Steel is a fascinating read that tells the history of humanities development from the time we could begin to call ourselves Homo sapiens. There was much in this book I didn’t know, and I feel like I could read it again and find things I missed. The author tries to answer questions centered…

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Twelve Books that Changed World: What about the Movies?

By: on April 13, 2014

Now don’t get me wrong, I love books and they have changed my life for the better; but what about the movies? I thoroughly enjoyed Melvyn Bragg’s book, 12 Books that Changed the World. Bragg is an Englishman who chose all English books by male authors. He summarized the books and shared why they changed…

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The Tour Guide and the Citadelle

By: on April 12, 2014

Over the years I have come to love reading and books.  Throughout my life many books have had great impact on the way I think, process and even the way I live.  A few books which stand out as great refiners are, The Prodigal Son by Henri Nouwen; Sabbath  by Dan Allendar; The Bible; Emotionally…

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World Changers

By: on April 12, 2014

Major shifts in history are a combination of a variety of elements which would include contemporary political and economic climate, needs and aspirations of the populace, available technology etc.  The tipping occurs with a single individual or a group of people with a vision of transformation,  passionately committed to something they firmly believe in,  willing…

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