DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

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Geology, The Hero’s Journey, and Societal Change

By: on February 24, 2022

    Joseph Campbell wrote, “Not everyone has a destiny: only the hero who has plunged to touch it, and has come up again—with a ring.”[1] Simon Winchester, author, journalist, and broadcaster, might offer a paraphrase based on his book, The Map that Changed the World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology.[2] He…

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Geology, Geography, In an Ever-Changing World

By: on February 24, 2022

Some people may say we experience peace and harmony in the world, or at least until recently. Although, I personally did not experience the Second World War, I have passionately engaged with the history of that time period. The books, the people, the places and the events have impact on my world view. In my…

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With No Regard for the Ancient Nations They Cleaved Apart

By: on February 24, 2022

In his book, “The Map That Changed the World,” Winchester gives an in-depth geological and historical survey of William Smith’s strata map. Smith, an 18th and 19th century English geologist, began his career as a surveyor. Throughout his career of surveying canals, he begins to observe the depth of the strata or layers of sentiment…

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Thriving on the Margins of the New Map

By: on February 24, 2022

I wonder if anyone ever traced the success rate of those voted “most likely to succeed” in their high school. Certain traits or advantages prepare some for the potential that may or may not be realized. I enjoy the true stories of those who succeeded without the outward signs indicating potential. For that reason, Forrest…

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Map-Making Tales From the Past

By: on February 23, 2022

In Simon Winchester’s 2001 bestselling book, The Map That Changed the World, the true story is told of the world’s first geographical map and the man who created it. Such a mundane description however belies the fascinating tale that lies behind the man and his achievement. With a novelist’s touch, the author Simon Winchester details…

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Stress to Strength

By: on February 23, 2022

Simon Winchester, the author of The map that changed the world, writes about the epic and stretched journey of William Smith, a geologist who mapped the first ever geological map of England, Wales, and southern Scotland, which gave way to modern geological discoveries. The book can be categorized under biography, and Winchester describes the revolutionary…

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A Whole New World

By: on February 23, 2022

According to the National Geographic, a map is, “a symbolic representation of selected characteristics of a place, usually drawn on a flat surface. Maps present information about the world in a simple, visual way.”[1] Maps are critical to how we understand and navigate the world. Today, most of society is reliant on a version of…

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Joy and Not Sorrow

By: on February 23, 2022

I cannot help but feel deep sadness as I finish The Map That Changed the World by Simon Winchester. Written as a historical review of the geological accomplishments of the late William Smith who, in 1815, created the world’s first geological map. This map “heralded the beginnings of a whole new science…. [and] laid the…

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The Elusive Root Cause

By: on February 19, 2022

What influenced the development of the capitalistic way of life? This is the question Max Weber sought to address in The Protestant Ethic and the “Spirit” of Capitalism (and Other Writings). Weber (1864-1920) wrote this treatise in 1905 (the book in which it is found also includes the back-and-forth written conversations he had with critiques…

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Reflections of a Brain-Dead Sloth

By: on February 18, 2022

Reflections of a brain-dead sloth on the Protestant work ethic, and its interrelationship with the “spirit of Capitalism.” [1] I sit in the silence of my home now that the stalwart construction workers of the past two weeks have ceased their pounding. In an economic season of labor shortages and supply chain issues, the timely…

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Working for What Purpose?

By: on February 17, 2022

Well-known German sociologist and historian, Max Weber made significant contributions to the fields of social science and cross-cultural studies. In his work, The Protestant Ethic and the “Spirit” of Capitalism, he argues that the stimulus of capitalism had a spiritual root, namely from the Calvinists. As a book categorized within the social sciences, the historical…

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If You’re Happy and You Know It Then You’re Saved

By: on February 17, 2022

There’s an old joke in the American South that asks, what’s the difference between a Baptist and Methodist? The punch line? The Methodist will speak to you in the liquor store. This joke always brings a smirk to the most stoic Baptists and Methodists among us. It is funny because it taps on the underlying…

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When Your Professor Says Write Boring :)

By: on February 17, 2022

The Protestant Ethic and the “Spirit” of Capitalism by Max Weber makes the argument that John Calvin’s doctrine of predestination paved the way for the formulation of the protestant work ethic and in doing so birthed the ethos of capitalism.  Weber, a German sociologist, fancied himself as a historian of economies.  His book offered a…

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Show Me Your Faith by Showing Me Your Works

By: on February 17, 2022

In Max Weber’s book, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, the idea of religion shaping human characteristics, such as industriousness and self-denial, can positively affect the creation of wealth among the citizens of a nation. The premise of this book is immensely fascinating. The interplay of how faith shapes an individual’s work is…

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Protestant Work Ethic 2.0

By: on February 17, 2022

First published in 1904-5, Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and The Spirit of Capitalism is a modern classic that seeks to address several important issues. First, weber set out to examine the development of the family business in Europe between the 17th century and the 19th century[1]. Family businesses are usually small enterprises which, in…

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Thumbing Through “The Institutes” for Citations on Free Markets

By: on February 17, 2022

A few fun facts to comb through: The Bible addresses money over 2,172 times. To give us a little comparison, the Bible talks about “believing” 273 times, “praying” 371 times, and “love” 714 times.  Jesus spoke of money in 16 of his 38 parables, and 1 out of 7 verses in Matthew, Mark & Luke is about…

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360 view on Spirit of Capitalism

By: on February 16, 2022

Max Weber, the author of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, discussed the relationship between the economy of modern capitalism to Protestant ethics and beliefs. Weber contends that our “secular and materialistic culture is partly indebted to a spiritual revolution: the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century.”[1] Max Weber was a German sociologist,…

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Working 9 to 5 Just to Make a Living?

By: on February 16, 2022

I recall hearing a story years ago that came to mind during this week’s reading. A fisherman rests under a tree in the afternoon after a day where he caught enough fish to feed his family. A businessman from another land comes and asks the fisherman why he is resting when the day still contains…

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Excellence In All Things

By: on February 16, 2022

The Protestant Ethic and the ‘Spirit’ of Capitalism and Other Writings is a compilation of essays written by the late Max Weber. As a historian and sociologist, many have argued that his essay, The Protestant Ethic and the ‘Spirit’ of Capitalism, is one of the most influential social science works of our time.[1] Weber notes…

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