DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Following the Heart of God for His People

Written by: on November 5, 2023

Introduction

The Sound of Leadership by Dr. Jules Glanzer is analogous to a ‘little black book’ for leadership. It is a handbook on how to integrate your inner faith with your calling – whether that’s in the marketplace or kingdom setting. And the book is so practical it applies from the C-suite to the K-suite (kitchen). In the Overture of the book, Leonard Sweet sets the stage by writing that the “primary metaphor for the 21st Century is a musical symphony, consisting of rhythm, melody, and harmony.”… Sweet continues to write that Dr. Glanzer’s The Sound of Leadership is the global language of leadership.[1]

Musical Scale of Leadership

Dr. Glanzer succinctly presents his kingdom notes on the congruence of leadership and music with his memorable scale of listen, see, learn, do, and love. His development of each note is a master class in leadership and kingdom living. The specifics of each are: Listen to God and others. See as best one can from all aspects and then press into God to see or discern from his perspective. Learn all you can, process the information, formulate a vision, and develop a plan. Do is synonymous with Nike’s ‘Just Do It’ slogan. Lastly, love with the heart of God – without it, one is a clanging cymbal.[2]

Authentic Leadership

In my quest to research additional information on The Sound of Leadership, I discovered a recent podcast from Unconventional Ministry that features Dr. Glanzer. In the podcast, ‘Triaging the Competing Voices – The Sound of Leadership by Dr. Jules Glanzer,’ the host posits the question of how serious the current leadership breakdown is. Glanzer’s response is again analogous to a master class. He articulates that current leadership needs to be fixed because it is focused on outward appearances, accolades, and accomplishments. Dr. Glanzer goes on to say that based on his experience, what is important is that “an authentic leadership lifestyle results from living out of who we are as leaders – it is being – that results in doing.”[3] It is listening to who God is calling us to be and do. His authentic leadership lifestyle statement piqued a reflective note because it is the constant thread permeating our recent identity assignments and discussions. It challenged me to dig deeper.

Details of Authentic Leadership

As a teacher, when I start a new research endeavor, I want to look up words to be sure I am starting from a foundation of understanding. A basic definition of identity is our sense of who we are as individuals and as members of social groups. Authenticity means you’re true to your personality, values, and spirit regardless of the pressure that you’re under to act otherwise. You are honest with yourself and others and take responsibility for your mistakes. In digging deeper, here’s an excerpt from an article on authentic leadership effectiveness, “authentic leaders are leaders who (1) know who they are, and what they believe in; (2) display transparency and consistency between their values, ethical reasoning, and actions; (3) focus on developing positive emotional states such as confidence, optimism, hope, and resilience within themselves and, (4) are widely known and respected for their integrity.’[4] The second point from the article that helped in crystalizing the idea of authentic leadership is that it is “a leadership by presence that transcends position.”[5] Essentially, this means that the authentic leader will not only impact their followers but also will impact those higher up the organizational ladder in such a way that they are influenced and, at times, become followers. They are recognized for their integrity, ethical behavior, and are trustworthy.[6] Isn’t this the leadership style exemplified by Jesus?

Transformational Journey

One final thought from the research article on authentic leadership to mention because it is noteworthy, and it dovetails nicely with Glanzer’s work. It answers the question of how one develops authentic leadership characteristics. Based on the article, authenticity requires a transformational journey that allows the individual to create their sense of self, work out their lived experiences, and put meaning into their experiences. Furthermore, it is a journey of understanding ourselves, developing our sense of purpose, values, and understanding what motivates us.[7] Simon Walker called it backstage work. Glanzer identifies it as the mission of God carried out by individuals who allow God to shape their lives.[8] Glanzer states in the podcast that God always starts with the heart and works from within. The authentic leader is one that God has shaped the person’s heart, and they are leading out of their being from within.

Conclusion

To conclude, there are two significant differences between a marketplace leader and a kingdom leader. A kingdom leader has a heart surrendered to God and is willing to allow God’s voice to be the final judge, versus a marketplace leader who seeks the outward accolades of culture. Finally, the kingdom leader, according to Glanzer, doesn’t build the kingdom; instead, they seek the kingdom. In contrast, the marketplace leaders seek to build their empires.[9]

[1] Jules Glanzer, The Sound of Leadership: Kingdom Notes to Fine Tune Your Life and Influence (Plano: invite Press, 2023), xix-xx.

[2] Ibid., 2.

[3] Unconventional Ministry, ‘Triaging Competing Voices – The Sound of Leadership with Dr. Jules Glanzer,’ S4 #Ep. 115, https://sat7usa.podbean.com/e/triaging-competing-voices-the-sound-of-leadership-with-dr-jules-glanzer-s3-ep113/

[4] Tineke Wulffers, “Authentic Leadership Effectiveness for Individuals and Teams: A Coaching Approach”. Randburg, South Africa: KR Publishing (2017): 6, https://search-ebscohost-com.georgefox.idm.oclc.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=1595178&scope=site.

[5] Ibid., 7.

[6] Ibid., 7.

[7] Ibid., 8.

[8] Jules Glanzer, The Sound of Leadership: Kingdom Notes to Fine Tune Your Life and Influence (Plano: invite Press, 2023), 42.

[9] Unconventional Ministry, ‘Triaging Competing Voices – The Sound of Leadership with Dr. Jules Glanzer,’ S4 #Ep. 115, https://sat7usa.podbean.com/e/triaging-competing-voices-the-sound-of-leadership-with-dr-jules-glanzer-s3-ep113/

About the Author

Audrey Robinson

8 responses to “Following the Heart of God for His People”

  1. mm Daron George says:

    Hi Audrey,

    Dr. Glanzer emphasizes an “authentic leadership lifestyle” that stems from our being, shaped by God’s influence on our hearts. How do you see this form of leadership being applied in your life, and what specific practices help you to cultivate it consistently?

    Thanks 🙂

    • Audrey Robinson says:

      Hey Daron,
      One of the areas that I see this form of leadership applied to my life is in the area of integrity. Regardless of the unethical situations I may have found myself in with co-workers or peer leadership teams, I refused to succumb to pressure of being unethical or doing something that knowingly brought dishonor to the Lord.

      What practices that help me cultivate it consistently – it is daily seeking His face. Psalm 27:8 My heart said to You, “Your face, Lord, I will seek.”

  2. mm Chad McSwain says:

    Hi Audrey

    Great summary of Glazer’s work and nice addition of different resources. I am going to have to find podcast with Glazer.
    You offer this observation about leadership, “It is listening to who God is calling us to be and do. His authentic leadership lifestyle statement piqued a reflective note because it is the constant thread permeating our recent identity assignments and discussions. It challenged me to dig deeper.”
    Do you have any examples from your life of living into the calling of being rather than doing? I’m always curious about examples of those in professional settings living by the calling of God in their careers.

    • Audrey Robinson says:

      Chad,
      I think I understand your question. I would have to say being a teacher. Teaching, training and all of the work leading up to pulling together (research) a training seminar or class is my living out of who God created me to be. As a result, it’s not hard. And I’ve taken far less money in the academic setting because I finally figured out I am a teacher. When I coach, I’m teaching. When I write, I’m teaching. When I speak, I’m teaching. So I rarely feel like I’m doing or just going through the motions.

  3. Alana Hayes says:

    I am going to have to find that podcast! You are so right! Foundational elements are key!

    You stated: Finally, the kingdom leader, according to Glanzer, doesn’t build the kingdom; instead, they seek the kingdom.

    How you wrote it…. I was not sure if you were 100 percent on board with this thought. What are your personal thoughts with this statement?

    • Audrey Robinson says:

      Alana,
      I probably sounded on the fence because I am. (lol) I am still thinking about it. Intellectually I understand and agree with the concept of kingdom leaders seek God. In practicality, how does that work if you are “building” a business that has a kingdom mission? Similarly, what does one say to the pastor that is required to have the skillset of a CEO? I should re-visit the book since Dr. Glanzer mentioned he does write about it. Perhaps there’s more.

      What are your thoughts?

  4. mm Shonell Dillon says:

    Great post, I like how you gave us the differences of a marketplace leader and kingdom leader. How is this knowledge important to you in your leadership?

    • Audrey Robinson says:

      It is very important to me. As I pivot to focus more on my business I have wrestled with some of the mechanics like marketing strategy and a few other things. I recently sensed that God wants me to ask Him for the specifics of how to build the business. And when I say build, it is getting the mechanics of it from Him. So I’m focused on seeking Him and His direction because ultimately it all belongs to Him.

      What about you?

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