DLGP

Doctor of Leadership in Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

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Life in the Cage.

By: on January 17, 2013

This semester my cohort is focusing on capitalism, consumerism and leadership. Our first assigned reading was Max Weber’s, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Weber penned it in German in 1904 and 1905, but it’s a book that speaks to the heart of today’s American society.  There are lots of ideas from this…

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Dispatches From the Front of A Financial Crisis

By: on January 16, 2013

Spain is in the midst of a crippling financial crisis.  Several months ago a friend of mine explained to me that this current crisis could be explained by the fact that the banks in Germany were controlled by Calvinistic Lutherans who believed that the doctrine of predestination applied to one’s economic station in life.  If…

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Why Should the Devil have all the Good Music?

By: on January 16, 2013

Why Should the Devil have all the Good Music? These were familiar lyrics when I was a youth.  Larry Norman had begun a revolution in Christian music.  Loosely translated, it meant that we, as Christians, could still have fun! But in “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism” by Max Weber, we’re shown that…

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“Capitalizing on Convergence”

By: on November 19, 2012

Today we take for granted many uses of technology that were nonexistent just a decade ago. Furthermore, much of the technology that we can’t imagine living without today results from the convergence of media technology. In their chapter on convergence, Briggs and Burke provide a good working definition for the term convergence. They say, “The…

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IPhone Leadership: Leading with Impact and Integrity

By: on November 18, 2012

Technology and communication have come a long way in the past couple of centuries. Can you believe it? The first stamp was produced in 1840 when letters were transported by ships and trains. Letters took weeks, sometimes months to be delivered around the world (Briggs and Burk 2010). Another communication invention in 1837 the telegraph…

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Media and Gender

By: on November 17, 2012

I flew into Jakarta early this week for a gender training of trainers workshop.  While engaging in the workshop during the day, I read the second half of Briggs and Burke’s Social History of the Media at night.   I couldn’t help but filter much of the information through the gender lens that I had donned.…

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culture pessimism and media critique

By: on November 16, 2012

In the past two weeks I read the book „A social history of the media. From Gutenberg to the internet“ by Asa Briggs and Peter Burke. Last week I concentrated more in the impact different early inventions like the printing press had on communication, media and our absorbing social behavior. This week now, we are…

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“My Mother is Your Mother”

By: on November 16, 2012

Centuries ago, Gutenberg took center stage with the printing press which allowed the masses access to books and articles that only the wealthy and affluent could afford. With such tools, now that the common people had an opportunity to be persuasive and use their knowledge as a powerful resource in their daily business transactions, social…

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The Media Conspiracy

By: on November 15, 2012

We get all of our information through some form of media. Most people feel there is a bias and have a degree of skepticism. Reactions to media we do not agree with can be intense. Some think there is a subversive conspiracy. We may think a few powerful people seek to control society. The long…

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Knowing & Controlling One’s Bias

By: on November 15, 2012

A Social History of The Media is a history book.  It’s stated aim is “to show the relevance of the past to the present by bringing history into media studies and the media into history.” Overall, I enjoyed reading the book.  Both Asa Briggs and Peter Burke wrote in a clear, understandable, and enjoyable style,…

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Back to the Basics

By: on November 15, 2012

It is a day of great celebration in India and I hear the sounds of random fireworks. Millions of Indians all over India and the world are celebrating one of the most popular annual festivals of Hindus. It is Deepavali or ‘Diwali’ in short, the “festival of lights”. India knows how to celebrate a festival. …

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Jesustainment

By: on November 15, 2012

In the second half of A Social History of the Media, Briggs and Burke shift to an analysis of the more recent methods of communication. In the late 1800’s there was a move towards the blending of information and entertainment creatively called infotainment.             Informing the public was (and is) a worthy goal for the…

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Beauty and Truth

By: on November 15, 2012

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” – that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. –       John Keats, Ode on a Grecian Urn Jean-François Lyotard in his groundbreaking The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge spoke of the “computerization of society” and how this shift would highlight the connections and relations…

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It’s about influence….and Soap Operas

By: on November 15, 2012

There was devotion and dedication. There was love and passion.  There was craving and yearning.  We could see it in the faces of our neighbors and friends.  A surprise at first, but after some time, we too began to experience the same sensations!  And it happened each night.  Six nights a week!  It was our…

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“Cyberspace & Skyfall”

By: on November 15, 2012

Recently, I watched the new James Bond movie “Skyfall.”  One specific scene (please see attached video clip) reminded me of the book my cohort and I are reading for our doctoral program; and particularly chapter 8 “In and Out of Cyberspace.” The book is called A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the…

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Playing for the Patch

By: on November 15, 2012

It was like Christmas morning.  Out of nowhere my parents decided to surprise my brother, sister and I on a whim.  For six months we had been asking, not really, more like begging our parents to buy us an Atari 2600.  As a ten year old in 1982, I thought it was the coolest game…

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“How Then Shall They Hear?”

By: on November 10, 2012

The first four chapters of the Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet proved to be an interesting and fascinating read.   I was drawn to the writings on the Media and the Public Sphere in Early Europe.  I was struck by the many parallels between the role of the media during the…

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“The 4th Branch of Government”

By: on November 9, 2012

Within the last 24 hours, several dozen teenagers have expressed to me their feelings about the recent presidential election. While some came across angry and disappointed, others were excited and hopeful, and still others could care less either way. Maybe one of the most striking similarities in each group was that the majority of the…

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