Comings and Goings

Monday, April 6th, 2020

Judy Deale (Education), Aimee Soles (Student Accounts), Lorie Brubaker (Science Outreach Program) and Jesse Dillow (Plant Services) are no longer with the university.

Comings and Goings

Monday, March 2nd, 2020

Gabe Benfield has made the transition from part time to full time as a security officer in the Campus Public Safety office. A 2019 graduate of George Fox, from which he earned a bachelor’s degree in social work, he has worked for the department as an unarmed security officer since the fall of 2015. Also, for the past three years, he has worked as a retail sales associate for Pool and Spa House in Portland. Gabe has also volunteered in the Portland Police Cadet Program for the past five years. He lives in Gresham and is engaged to be married to his fiancée, Briyonna, this June. He attends Grace Community Church in Gresham.


The Campus Public Safety office has hired David Bower to work as a security officer on a part-time basis. He has worked in the education field for more than 20 years, serving most recently as a substitute teacher in the Forest Grove, McMinnville, Newberg and Tigard-Tualatin school districts for the past five years. Previously, he was a special education teacher for three years (2012-15) in the Multnomah Education Service District and for one year in the Northwest Regional ESD in Hillsboro (2010-11). Also, for the past eight years, he has volunteered as the lead administrator for the Portland Superheroes Coalition, which raises funds for Doernbecher and Randall children’s hospitals by having superheroes appear at child-related events to provide energy and encourage charitable donations. David holds both a bachelor’s degree in writing/literature (1998) and a master of arts in teaching degree (2000) from George Fox. He lives in Newberg with his wife Kristeen and their children Marcus and Ali. The family attends Red Hills Church.


Aga Luptak has joined the university to work as a benefits and leave administrator in the human resources office. For the past three years she has worked as a senior leave and disability examiner with the Standard Insurance Company in Hillsboro. Prior to that, she was a long-term disability manager, plan sponsor liaison and senior leave coordinator with Aetna in Portland for six and a half years. In all, Aga has worked in the HR field for 14 years, beginning her career as a human resource benefits specialist and human resource assistant with DNC Parks and Resorts at Yosemite National Park in California. Prior to coming to the U.S., she taught English as a second language in Poland for two years. She holds both a master’s degree in English philology (2002) and a postgraduate diploma in legal and business translation (2003) from the University of Wroclaw in Wroclaw, Poland. Aga lives in Beaverton with her husband Josh and their son Enzo. She also has a stepson, Brody. She attends the Old Town Church in Forest Grove.


Laura Schott, a former NCAA Division I head coach and player, has been hired as the university’s new women’s head soccer coach. She arrives with an impressive resume, which includes four high school state championships as a player at Jesuit High School (Oregon), a school-record-setting career at the University of California, and a stint as a professional and international player. As a player, she set school records at Cal for career goals and single-season goals, for which she was inducted into the Golden Bears’ Hall of Fame in 2017. As a junior in 2001, she was a finalist for the Hermann Trophy, given to the nation’s top player, and was named All-Pac-10 in each of her four seasons. After graduating with a pair of bachelor’s degrees in political science and mass communications, Laura played professionally for the Washington Freedom of the WUSA (2003) and the California Storm of the WPSL (2004). She made five international appearances, including four starts, as a member of the U.S. Senior Women’s National Team in 2001. After retiring as a player, Laura transitioned to coaching and has worked with the Portland Thorns Development Academy, FC Portland, Portland State University, U.S. Soccer, and Formation Sports. At Portland State, she was a two-time Big Sky Coach of the Year (2009, 2013) and coached her teams to four regular-season titles, including three in a row from 2011 to 2013. While there, she earned a master’s degree in education in 2016. Laura currently works for the Portland Thorns Development Academy, overseeing all aspects of its U14-U19 teams, including its college recruitment and placement program. She also runs her own business, Formation Sports, as an educational platform to grow the game. She lives in Charbonneau with her daughter, Gracen, and attends Grace Chapel in Wilsonville.


Darla Norgren (Operations Manager/Portland Center), Katie Sol (HR), Tai Harden-Moore (Advancement) and Torey Smith (Athletics) are no longer with the university.

Movers & Quakers

Monday, March 2nd, 2020

Andrea Byerley has been hired as a regular part-time administrative assistant with the Oregon Writing Project. She will continue to work her half-time, nine-month position as a learning support services coordinator in the Disability Services Office.

About Our People

Monday, March 2nd, 2020

Ashley Lippard (Art and Design) was honored, along with her colleagues, for her work with the Community Wellness Collective, named the Volunteer Organization of the Year by the Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce. Lippard serves on the board and works as a brand and marketing manager for the group, dedicated to providing mental health and addiction services in Yamhill County.

Wendy Flint (IDEA Center Director) and Sidney Tafflinger (IDEA Center CAP Coach) presented in a national webinar for National Association of Colleges and Employers members on Feb. 19. Seventy-five career center leaders, academic and career coaches, and university administrators attended the one-hour webinar on “Integrating Advising and Career Development.” An increasing number of universities are evaluating the IDEA Center model, which successfully increased student appointments from 500 to 4,800 over five years. The overall program evaluation was 4.6 out of 5, with a 4.62 for “Topic Relevance.” NACE commented, “You hit it out of the ballpark!”

Comings and Goings

Monday, February 17th, 2020

Josh Guffey joins the physician assistant program this semester as an assistant professor. He will be working remotely on a part-time basis. For the past year, he’s served as director of Continuing Professional Development at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy – an institution at which he’s also worked as a clinical assistant professor since 2013. In addition, he’s spent the past three years working as a clinical professor and director of pharmacology and pharmacotherapy at North Greenville University’s Department of Physician Assistant Medicine in Greer, South Carolina. Josh has also been the director of pharmacy education and a clinical pharmacy specialist at Atrium Health in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 2013. Previously, he worked as a clinical pharmacy specialist for the Greenville Health System in Greenville, South Carolina, and clinical assistant professor with the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy. Josh holds a doctor of pharmacy degree from Wingate University School of Pharmacy and a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. He lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, with his wife, Brittany, and daughter, Annelise.


The university has hired Heidi Hopkins to work as the field coordination specialist in the bachelors and masters of social work programs. For the past three and a half years she has worked as a mindfulness educator teaching short courses in Newberg Public Schools as well as leading retreats, workshops and classes in the community. Heidi has also worked since 2016 as a spiritual director for private clients and PsyD graduate students at George Fox as part of their degree requirements. Previously, from 2007 to 2018, she hosted children in a weekly, Montessori-based, contemplative Christian experience. Heidi earned a bachelor’s degree in human biology from Stanford University in 1995. She lives in Dundee with her husband and three children and attends Journey Church.


Nick Sullivan joins the university to work as manager of the maker hub in the Klages Center. A 2013 graduate of Norwich University and a 2015 graduate of the Air Force Institute of Technology, he holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering. For three years, he was stationed at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, where, as an Air Force captain and developmental engineer, he conducted engineering work on the F-35 Lightning II. He worked in the squadron’s Threat Modeling Team, where he managed a team of active duty military members, civilians, and contractors that built and tested radar simulations. Nick has worked the past year as an associate recreation minister for Crosspoint United Methodist Church in Niceville, Florida, leading a small recreation team and facilitating both adult and youth sports leagues. He lives in Wilsonville and attends Red Hills Church.


Josiah Philipsen (IT) and Jim Steele (Business) are no longer with the university.

About Our People

Monday, February 17th, 2020

Anderson Campbell (Christian Studies) published an article on prayer and the Be Known promise in the February 2020 issue of Didaktikos: Journal of Theological Education. Didaktikos is a peer-reviewed journal written by professors, for professors, who teach in biblical, theological, and related disciplines and who help train pastors and other ministry leaders.

Nijay Gupta (Seminary) collaborated with eight masters-level students to publish a free book, Shall Be Bright at Last: Reflections on Suffering and Hope in the Letters of Paul, on the university’s Digital Commons network. In it, Nijay and his students write sermon-style reflections on suffering and hope in Paul. “We all share difficult life stories and we lean towards hope, even though we cannot always see the silver lining,” Nijay says of the book. “The church has a hard time talking about suffering and pain. I hope this book will help to broach this subject.”

Paul Anderson’s (Christian Studies) essay, “The John, Jesus, and History Project and a Fourth Quest for Jesus,” was published in Jesus, Skepticism, and the Problem of History: Criteria and Context in the Study of Christian Origins, and his essay “On Truth & Recognition,” was published in the Shepherd Heart Newsletter. Paul also organized a consultation on “Values of Transformative Spirituality” (Joseph Clair presenting) and presented two papers in San Diego in November: “‘Little Children, Stay Away from Idols!’ – The Last Word as the First Word in the Johannine Situation: 1 John 5:21 and the Roman Imperial Cult,” in the Jesus Traditions, Gospels, and Negotiating the Roman Imperial World Section of SBL; and “Inspiring Readings of the Inspired Text – Taking the Bible Personally, After the Manner of Friends,” in the Quaker Theological Discussion Group. He also co-organized the “Call to Ministry Conference – Answering God’s Call” at Clackamas Park Friends Church in October and preached at Rosedale Friends Church in January.

Ed Higgins (Writer in Residence/English Emeritus) published three poems recently. His “Side by Each” piece appeared in the Feb. 13 issue of the literary magazine Nightingale & Sparrow, and his “Tohono O’odham: The Desert People” was published in the Feb. 11 issue of Line Rider Press, an online poetry magazine. Finally, Ed’s poem “Dürer’s Eve” appeared in the Jan. 29 issue of Ekphrastic Review, an online journal devoted entirely to writing inspired by visual art.

Comings and Goings

Monday, January 13th, 2020

The university welcomes David Cimbora as the new dean of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. He arrives from the Rosemead School of Psychology at Biola University in La Mirada, California, where he served for 22 years, most recently as associate dean of doctoral programs since 2016. As associate dean, he was program chair for both the PhD and PsyD programs in clinical psychology. In addition, he oversaw the accreditation and admissions processes for both doctoral programs. Previously, David served as director of clinical training at Rosemead from 2005 to 2016 for both the PhD and PsyD programs. His Rosemead tenure has included stints as a full professor (2015-19), associate professor (2004-15) and assistant professor (1997 to 2004). A licensed psychologist since 1999, he also worked at the Biola Counseling Center for 22 years seeing couples and individual patients. In all, his career in psychology has spanned more than 25 years and has included work in educational and clinical settings in Colorado, New Mexico and California. David holds a PhD (1997) and master’s degree (1994) in child clinical psychology from the University of Denver, as well as a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Washington (1991). He lives in Dundee and is married to Marie. They have two children: Nathaniel (18) and Sam (16).


The physician assistant program has hired Mariah Fredericks as an administrative assistant. She is a familiar face on campus, having served since August of 2018 as an assistant coach with the university’s women’s soccer team. Previously, she served as a global intern for the Samaritan’s Purse organization in 2017, gaining experience in volunteer recruitment and event facilitating. While serving with Samaritan’s Purse in Myanmar, she created curriculum nutrition program activities, and planned and coordinated community partnership and local outreach events. Mariah was also a volunteer soccer coach with Soccer Without Borders in Greeley, Colorado, in 2018. She earned a bachelor’s degree in youth ministry and organizational development from Colorado Christian University (2017), where she was a member of the school’s 2016 national championship soccer team at the NCAA Division II level. Mariah lives in Newberg and attends Saint’s Hill Church.


Mary Lou Lewis joins the university to work as an administrative assistant in the music department. For the past two years she’s worked as a tax executive assistant for Delap LLP in Lake Oswego, where she managed the day-to-day needs of tax partners and tax department staff. Previously, she was employed for four years at Providence St. Vincent Hospital in Portland as an administrative assistant for radiologists. Mary Lou has also worked as a real estate broker and as a legal administrative assistant for a San Francisco-based law firm. Outside of work, she has been active as a board member, event committee member and volunteer coordinator for the Young People’s Theatre Project in Portland over the past 11 years. Mary Lou holds a bachelor’s degree in social services from Western Washington University (1986). She lives in Wilsonville with her husband Jeffery, and they have four grown children – Joseph, Jacob, Emily and Matthew. She attends the Church of the Resurrection in Tualatin, where she is part of its praise band.


Heather Rollins joins the university as an assistant professor in the physician assistant program. Prior to her arrival, she worked as a physician assistant in primary care for more than 11 years at the WVP Keizer Clinic in Keizer, Oregon, where she also served on WVP’s management, quality improvement and finance committees in recent years. She started her physician assistant career in urgent care in Fort Wayne, Indiana. In all, she joins George Fox with more than 14 years of clinical experience. She earned a doctor of medical science degree from Lynchburg University in 2019 and previously completed physician assistant training at the University of Saint Francis in Fort Wayne, Indiana, earning a master’s degree in physician assistant studies in 2005. Heather enjoys spending time with her family, with whom she likes to hike, kayak and camp throughout Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.


Curt Stilp brings more than 20 years of medical experience to his role as an associate professor and associate director of the School of Medical Science (PA program). For the past 11 years he has worked at Oregon Health and Science University as an assistant professor in the school’s Division of Physician Assistant Education (2008-19). Curt most recently held the position of associate professor in the school’s Office of Academic Affairs and Division of Physician Assistant Education (2019). He also served as director of OHSU’s Oregon Area Health Education Center (AHEC) the past three years. In the three years previous, he was an assistant professor in OHSU’s Office of Academic Affairs. Prior to his arrival in Portland, Curt was an assistant professor (2007-08), instructor (2005-07) and lecturer (2004-05) in the Physician Assistant Department at Rosalind Franklin University in North Chicago, Illinois. He holds a doctorate in higher education and education leadership from Portland State University (2017), a master of science from the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science (2001) and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Winona State University (1997). He lives in Newberg with his wife of 22 years, Jodi, and their four children –  Grant, Katie, Alli, and Paige. The family attends Westside: A Jesus Church in Portland.


The student accounts office has hired Aimee Soles to serve as a student accounts specialist on both the Newberg and Portland campuses. She worked most recently as a services director for Daniels Chapel of the Roses in Santa Rosa, California (2015-16), for which she counseled families and made funeral arrangements. Previously, she was a clinical research coordinator for the St. Charles Medical Center in Bend (2014-15 and 2010-12) and a program assistant for the Kids Center in Bend, responsible for assisting its medical evaluation team (2013-14). Most recently, Aimee has volunteered her time to care for and engage individuals with Alzheimer’s general dementia through Catholic Charities’ Shaw Center for Memory Care in Santa Rosa (2016-18). Aimee earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of the Pacific in 1997. She lives in Beaverton with her husband Jay. They have three children – Aidan, Josie and Brent – and plan to launch a house church.


The advancement office welcomes Jessica Warburton as an associate director of development. She arrives with eight years of experience in the fundraising and development arena, most recently working as director of annual giving for the Boys & Girls Club of Salem, Marion and Polk Counties for the past year and a half. Before that, she worked for nearly five years as an area director for Young Life in Lampasas, Texas. Beyond work, Jessica is active at Outward Community Church in Salem, where she is part of a Bible study group that has supported the Marion County Food Share and Salem for Refugees programs. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communication and communication studies from Texas State University (2010). Jessica lives in Newberg with her sister.


Jekabs Bikis, dean of the College of Business since 2017, came to a mutual agreement with the university to end his employment at George Fox effective at the end of last month. Jekabs is a person of integrity who aligned with the university’s mission, and his service to the university is appreciated. We wish he and his family well in this next chapter of their life and encourage you to do the same if you see him on campus. During the spring semester, the provost’s office will manage day-to-day operations with assistance from the president and a group of business faculty.


Debbie Hawblitzel (Music), Kristi Welker (Student Life), Steve Wiley (Plant Services), Christine Saladino (Social Work) and Sarah Stevenson (Library) are no longer with the university.

Movers & Quakers

Monday, January 13th, 2020

Jeff Fair has transitioned to a position with plant services as a porter on the Newberg campus.

About Our People

Monday, January 13th, 2020

Mark McMinn (Doctor of Psychology) published an article, “Is the Wisdom of Mary Unique for a Teenager,” in the Dec. 13 online edition of Christianity Today magazine. In it, Mark uses the story of Christ’s birth to point out that conventional and practical wisdom don’t necessarily come with age, and that the wisdom of the young should not be overlooked or dismissed.

Ed Higgins (English Emeritus/Writer in Residence) published his poems “Garden Ruin” and “another distance” in the Winter 2019 issue of The Orchards Poetry Journal, an online publication. Ed also published his piece “tulips language” in the December 2019 issue of World Haiku Review, the official magazine of the World Haiku Club.

Ron Clark (Seminary) has been named executive director of the Kairos Church Planting organization. Regarding the future of Kairos, Clark says, “My hope is to see 100 new churches planted during my service and leadership and to see us develop Christian leaders who engage our culture, practice hands-on ministry, and proclaim a Gospel that transforms others into disciples of Jesus. I also hope that through this ministry we can provide hard evidence that Jesus truly saves and offers hope of transformation and healing.”

Comings and Goings

Monday, December 9th, 2019

The Office of Plant Services has hired Bart Hutchison as an electrician. He brings nearly 15 years of maintenance and repair experience. Most recently, he’s worked since July as a maintenance electrician for the National Frozen Foods Corporation operation in Albany, Oregon. Prior to that, he worked in the same capacity for Stahlbush Island Farms of Corvallis, Oregon (2018-19) and as a facilities electrician for Mount Angel Abbey and Seminary in Saint Benedict, Oregon (2016-18). Bart has been a licensed electrician since 2009 and previously attended Linn-Benton Community College. He lives in Albany with his wife Vanessa. They have three children – Bart Jr., Sidney and Ryker – and attends Neighborhood Church in Albany. He is also involved in missions work with his wife’s father’s church in Honduras, Edificando la Familia.


Fawn Kalugin has joined the university to work as an administrative assistant in the plant services office. For the past year she has worked as a project assistant for Woodburn Construction in Woodburn, Oregon, where she prepared contracts, did payroll and clerical work, and handled invoices, among other duties. Before that, she gained work experience in retail, serving as a brand ambassador for Banana Republic at its Woodburn location (2017-18) and as a sales associate at Wilsons Leather, also in Woodburn (2016-17). Fiofana lives in Gervais with her husband Joe. They attend Saint Nicholas in Woodburn.

About Our People

Monday, December 9th, 2019

Sarita Edwards (Christian Studies) coauthored a book, Breaking through the Boundaries: God’s Mission from the Outside In, published this fall through Orbis Books. In it, four experienced missiologists draw upon biblical narratives to highlight key roles played by those outside established Jewish/Christian religious tradition in the service of God’s mission. The authors apply the missiological insights gleaned from the biblical accounts to contemporary issues such as global migration crises and interreligious strife. Coauthoring the book were Azusa Pacific University’s Paul Hertig and Young Lee Hertig, and Robert L. Gallagher from the Wheaton College Graduate School.


Paige Parry (Biology) and two George Fox biology alumni, Elizah Stephens and Chris Murar, collaborated with Daniel Tinker from the University of Wyoming to publish a paper, “Environmental determinants of recruitment success of subalpine fir (Abies lasiocapra) in a mixed-conifer forest,” in Western North American Naturalist, a peer-reviewed scientific journal focusing on biodiversity and conservation in western North America.

Ed Higgins (Writer in Residence and English Professor Emeritus) published a haibun, “Syntax Connections,” in the most recent issue of the online journal Failed haiku (a Journal of English Senryu).

Don Powers (Biology) coauthored an article, “The allometry of daily energy expenditure in hummingbirds: an energy budget approach,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Animal Ecology. In it, the authors suggest that the unusually high energy cost of flight (including hovering) explains why daily energy expenditure increases with body size faster in hummingbirds than it does in any other warm-blooded animal.

Jennifer Lehman (Business) presented “Faith, Stewardship and Legacy Planning (and tax benefits for you)” at the First Presbyterian Church in Newberg on Nov. 24.

Kent Yinger’s (Seminary) book, God and Human Wholeness: Perfection in Biblical and Theological Tradition (Cascade, 2019), was released in October. In it, Kent argues that God intends flourishing and wholeness for his human creation rather than “perfection.”

Comings and Goings

Monday, November 25th, 2019

Melinda Olson has joined the graduate admissions counseling team to work as an admissions counselor for the Doctor of Education program. She arrives from the Hillsboro School District, where she was a secondary resource specialist for the past two years, teaching college and career prep classes for high school students. Melinda lived in Texas prior to that, working as a special education teacher at Hutto Middle School in Hutto, Texas (2015-16), serving as a fitness instructor at a YMCA in Austin, Texas (2013-14), and working as a special education coordinator (2011-13) and teacher (2010-11) at Harmony Charter School in Austin. She holds a master of education degree with a specialization in multicultural special education from the University of Texas (2006) and a bachelor’s degree in speech communications and public relations from Miami University (2005). Melinda lives in Hillsboro with her husband Russell, their two children, Xavier and Stella, and Shadow the dog. The family attends Sonrise Church in Hillsboro and enjoys exploring the outdoors and discovering good restaurants. Melinda’s hobbies include reading, cooking, Latin dancing, and as of very recently, knitting.


Cory Hand (Athletics), Kenton Miller (IT) and Matt Williams (Plant Services) are no longer with the university.

About Our People

Monday, November 25th, 2019

Nicole M. Enzinger (Education) published and presented two conference papers at the 41st annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. The first paper, “What does it take to be a fox? New horizons for communities of practice,” critiqued scholarly mathematics education communities with comparison to virtual mathematics education communities. The second paper, “Prospective teachers’ collective knowledge: Solving integer missing subtrahend problems,” described thinking from a collective perspective as a way to transition away from deficit perspectives on prospective teachers’ mathematical thinking. 

Mark David Hall’s (Politics) book, Did America Have a Christian Founding?, published this fall, earned a spot on World Magazine’s “2019 Books of the Year,” considered “vivid and insightful new releases for better understanding America, world events, history, science, and theology,” according to the publication’s website. Mark’s book made the short list of “Best History Books.”

Jenny Lehman (Business) recently published an article, “Charitable bequest importance among donors to different types of charities,” in the International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing.

Comings and Goings

Monday, November 11th, 2019

Steven Billings has joined plant services as an irrigation technician. For the past year and a half he’s worked for Landservices, Inc. of Hillsboro, serving as a landscape project estimator and manager. Previously, he did the same work for PGM Landscape in Portland (2017), worked as a maintenance manager for Lewis Landscape Services of Beaverton (2017) and was employed as an area manager for Coast Landscape Management in Napa, California (2014-15). Steven also owned and operated his own landscaping and maintenance business from 2004 to 2013. He attended both Linn Benton Community College and audited landscaping and horticulture courses at Oregon State University. He has been a state-certified landscape technician since 1995. Steven lives in Beaverton with Susan, his wife of 42 years. He has three children – Lorcy Ann, Tyler and Spenser – and attends City’s Edge Church in Beaverton.


Nina Inglesby has joined the advancement office as an operations specialist. She graduated this spring from Central Washington University with a master’s degree in information technology and administrative management. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in studio art from Central Washington (2018). Since finishing school, Nina has worked as a program coordinator for the Boys and Girls Club of Bend, Oregon, for which she did program planning for ages 7 to 13. Previously, she worked as an intern and gallery assistant work-study student at Gallery One in Ellensburg, Washington, in 2017-18. Nina lives in the Sylvan Highlands neighborhood of Portland with her husband, Henry, and attends Westside: A Jesus Church in Tigard. She is the daughter-in-law of employee Craig Inglesby, director of the university’s Bridge Network program.


The university’s IDEA Center has hired Carol Parker Walsh, JD, PhD, as an assistant director and as a career and internship coach. For the past five years, she has run her own consulting business, serving as a career and executive coach for high-achieving women, a personal branding expert and image consultant for entrepreneurial and professional women, and as a leadership and organizational consultant for small, mid-size and Fortune 500 companies and nonprofit associations. Previously, Carol worked as the associate dean for the School of Human and Organizational Development and director for the Master’s in Organizational Development & Leadership at Fielding Graduate University (2009-12). She’s also an Amazon best-selling author, a member of the Forbes Coaching Council and has presented on the TEDx stage at Portland State University. Carol has an extensive background in the healthcare industry, serving as an assistant professor in the doctoral program at the OHSU School of Nursing (2007-11) and as an assistant professor and interim director in the Oregon MPH program (2004-11). She holds a PhD in human and organizational systems from Fielding Graduate University (2005), a JD in employment law from Chicago-Kent College of Law (1991), master’s degrees in human development (2004) and organizational development/management (2002), both from Fielding, a bachelor’s degree in organizational communication from Loyola University of Chicago (1989), and has completed post-doctoral work in the public health program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel-Hill, and the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. She lives in Vancouver, Washington, with her husband Thomas. They have two adult children: Madelyn, a junior pre-med major at California Lutheran University, and Nicholas, a digital technology student at Washington State University.


Stephanie Bestland (Oregon Writing Project) is no longer with the university.

Movers & Quakers

Monday, November 11th, 2019

Holli Paskewich, formerly in the School of Education, is now an administrative assistant with the physician assistant program.

About Our People

Monday, November 11th, 2019

Javier Garcia (William Penn Honors Program) released a book, Recovering the Ecumenical Bonhoeffer: Thinking after the Tradition (Lexington Books/Fortress Academic), this month. In it, Javier explores the possibilities for Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s theology to revitalize interest in the ecumenical movement and Christian unity today. Although many commentators have lamented the waning interest in the ecumenical movement since the 1960s, the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in 2017, coupled with recent in-roads such as the ecumenical efforts of Pope Francis, have opened new possibilities for the ecumenical project. In this context, Javier presents Bonhoeffer as a helpful model for contemporary ecumenical dialogue.


Randy S. Woodley (Seminary) in October traveled to Nova Scotia to give the prestigious Hayward Lectures at Acadia Divinity College, the first George Fox professor to be extended that invitation. The lectures provide academic dialogue to stimulate critical engagement and reflection on key and emerging ideas in church history, Christian theology and biblical studies. The school hosts the event to give world-class scholars in the aforementioned disciplines the opportunity to present their freshest work and emerging or disruptive ideas in the formats of lecture, conversation and writing. While in Nova Scotia, Randy also spoke at the Acadia Chapel service, addressed Acadia faculty, engaged in several interviews, and preached at St. Andrews United Church of Canada in Halifax. The lecture series was entitled “Indigenous Theology as Original Instructions and a Critique of the Western Christian Worldview.”

Jennie Harrop and Rae Casey (Department of Professional Studies) have spoken at two conferences this fall on behalf of the university’s degree completion programs. On Oct. 4, the two offered a discussion titled “Ensuring Excellence: Training, Mentoring, & Affirming Adjunct Faculty in Degree Completion Programs” at the 2019 Leadership in Higher Education Conference in St. Louis. On Nov. 7, they presented a session, titled “More Than Just Basket-Weaving: The Challenge of Marketing Adult Ed to Colleagues, Administrators, and Those Who Hold the Purse Strings,” at the 2019 Council for Adult and Experiential Learning Conference in Chicago.

Brenda Morton (School of Education) and Anna Berardi (Graduate School of Counseling) are celebrating the wide reception of their open access textbook, Trauma-Informed School Practices: Building Expertise to Transform Schools. Released in September, it currently has more than 1,000 downloads, including at 120 institutions in 25 countries. The text identifies trauma-informed educator competencies and how these advancements invite systemic change involving all who are committed to K-12 education.

Ed Higgins’ (English Faculty Emeritus) poem, “Lattés,” appears in the “Coffee” section of Issue 49 (October 2019) of Hong Kong’s Voice & Verse Poetry Magazine. Ed also published a flash fiction story, “Arion, The Poet,” in the current online issue of Mediterranean Poetry (Oct. 26, 2019).

Megan Fisher (Parent and Family Programs) recently presented an educational session, entitled “Happy Little Accidents: Maximizing Campus Connections in Times of Transitions,” at the 2019 Association of Higher Education Parent/Family Program Professionals’ national conference. Fisher’s session explored how today’s changing attitudes toward higher education is forcing universities to maximize staffing while still continuing to provide consistent quality programming. She encouraged attendees to utilize campus networks and look for innovative opportunities to weather these changes in order to provide better collaboration, more opportunity to engage in healthy parent/student relationships, and increase diverse voices. Her session was one of 32 sessions chosen from 68 applicants.

About Our People

Monday, October 28th, 2019

Mark David Hall’s (Politics) book, Did America Have a Christian Founding?, was published this month by Thomas Nelson Books. In it, Mark debunks the assertion that America’s founders were deists who desired the strict separation of church and state and instead shows that their political ideas were profoundly influenced by their Christian convictions. In addition, Mark received word last week that the university’s John Dickinson Forum, created to promote thoughtful study, discussion and debate about America’s founding principles, was designated an “oasis of excellence” by the American Council of Trustees and Alumni.


Several of the Graduate School of Counseling faculty were in Seattle in mid-October for the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision 2019 National Conference. The group jointly presented on the topic, “Setting the Table for Critical Conversations Around Religious Privilege in Counselor Education.” Those in attendance included Michelle Engblom-Deglemann, Lorraine DeKruyf, Richard Shaw, Keith Dempsey, Unique Page and Keleigh Blount. Lorraine also presented on “School Counseling Site Supervisor Training: Overcoming Constraints Using a Brief Experiential Model” with Dr. Diana Gruman from Western Washington University and Dr. Lucy Purgason from Appalachian State University.


Paige Parry (Biology) collaborated with three colleagues to publish a research paper, “Multi-scale integration of tree recruitment and range dynamics in a changing climate,” in Global Ecology and Biogeography, a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal that specializes in publicizing research in the field of macroecology. Paige worked with Jeff Carroll (Colorado State University), Patrick Martin (the University of Denver) and Matthew Talluto (Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries in Berlin, Germany) to write the piece. The paper describes a novel integrated metamodeling approach designed to assimilate diverse datasets to improve projections of species responses to climate. Parry and colleagues applied this modeling approach to predict changes in distributions of western North American tree species while directly integrating information on tree recruitment.


Cherice Bock (seminary) wrote an entry on “Watershed Discipleship” in the book An Ecotopian Lexicon (University of Minnesota Press), released in October. The book suggests new words, novel interpretations of English words, and loanwords from other languages that can help us imagine how to adapt and even flourish in the face of socioecological adversity. Bock’s entry discusses the Christian framework of watershed discipleship: participating as stewards in the community of creation, building partnership networks of care within our local regions (watersheds), and emphasizing equity based on Christ’s invitation to love our neighbors.


Ed Higgins (Professor Emeritus, English Department/Writer-in-Residence) is coeditor of the anthology Hunger: The Best of Brilliant Flash Fiction 2014-2019. The collection was released at the Fort Collins Book Festival Oct. 19. In addition to coediting the story selections, Ed also wrote the anthology’s introduction, setting forth elements of this form of brief storytelling as, essentially, “Tell us a full story in 1,000 words or fewer.” The anthology’s international stories have been chosen from the Ireland/U.S.-based online journal Brilliant Flash Fiction. Several anthology authors gave readings, and flash fiction workshops were offered at the launch event.


Jenny Lehman (Business) presented at the Academy of Financial Services conference in Minneapolis on Oct. 16. Her presentation, “Work-Life Balance and Burnout Among Women in Financial Planning,” was coauthored with Cindy Riecke, Rebecca Henderson and Aman Sunder from the College for Financial Planning.

Comings and Goings

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Carter Bedsole has joined the university to work as a software architect for the new Catalyst College. A 2019 alumnus of George Fox, from which he earned a bachelor’s degree in both computer science and mathematics, he gained industry experience as a probability research intern at the University of Connecticut in the summer of 2018 and as a software design engineer for Tektronix in Beaverton after graduation. As a student at George Fox, Carter served as a resident assistant from 2017 to 2019. Also during his student days, he was part of a George Fox team of three that placed first in the state of Oregon in an Association for Computing Machinery-sponsored programming contest. He lives in Beaverton with his wife, KariAnna, also a George Fox graduate, and attends Church of the Vine, an Anglican church in Newberg.


The university welcomes Kirby Killen as an enrollment manager in the registrar’s office. She arrives from Joan Austin Elementary School in Newberg, where she has served as an educational assistant since February of this year. Prior to that, Kirby lived in Oklahoma, where she worked as the director of freshman experience at Oklahoma Christian University (2016-18) and as a freshman counselor (2012-16). She holds both a bachelor’s degree in psychology (2012) and an MBA (2016) from Oklahoma Christian University. Kirby lives in Newberg and attends Newberg Church of Christ.


Samantha Parrish (Campus Public Safety), Ally Weatherford (Social Work) and Edwin Espana (Plant Services) are no longer at the university.

Movers and Quakers

Monday, October 14th, 2019

With the reorganization of the registrar’s office, the following employees have been promoted: Nancy Fawver, to senior associate registrar; Tamara Reams, to associate registrar; Rachel Ryan, to assistant registrar; and Britny Scholz, to assistant registrar.

Sonia Rademacher has been promoted to the position of buyer in the plant services office.

About Our People

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Tricia Hornback (Intercultural Studies, Center for Peace & Justice) authored an article, “The Shifting Sands of American Indian Education in the Northwestern United States,” in the International Journal of Diversity in Education. The article provides an overview of significant historical influences affecting American Indian education and identifies encouraging emerging trends in American Indian education in the Northwest. Specific examples of encouraging trends in increased tribal involvement observed in federal Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) and Northwest public school districts are provided. Examples include educational partnerships with the Navajo Nation as well as Northwest tribes such as the Lummi Nation, Spokane Indian Tribe, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

George Fox employee Paul Fodge (Mathematics) is featured in an article, “A Custom Adaptive Tandem Trike,” that appears in Recumbent & Tandem Rider magazine (#64). The piece, written by engineering adjunct professor Nick Gilbert, details how the university’s servant engineering program undertook a project to build a custom wheelchair tandem bicycle to allow Fodge and his granddaughter to go for rides together.

An article in the fall issue of Advance, the magazine of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, highlights what George Fox is doing to address food insecurity on campus. In the piece, titled “More Than Just a Meal,” the university’s Bruin Community Pantry is featured, along with insight on the subject from Jere Witherspoon (Student Life). You can read it here.