DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

“Yeh sou ngoi nei”- Jesus Loves You!

Written by: on June 3, 2018

This week we read the book Chasing the Dragon by Jackie Pullinger.  I am amazed at her grit, commitment and dedication the her calling as she ministered in the Walled City   in Hong Kong. In reading chapter 10 “Try Jesus” I was captivated by her determination to reach the hardest and dangerous Chainwan drug lords. She was fearless in her approach to request to meet with each of them by name and go into deep dark places to shine light and love. Jackie earned the gang members respect by her bold approach to sharing the gospel. Her introduction to Chainwan began with a young man named David. He had been granted a second chance by a judge and had his court case dismissed. In doing so,David committed to follow Jesus. It was through David that Jackie met his Daih Lo (Big Brother) who was street nicknamed “Jesus”.  Jackie’s boldness can be witnessed in this exchange she had with David in the coffee shop:

“Who is your daih lo, David?” I asked. He looked terrified and shifted about on his plastic seat. “He won’t want to see you.” “But what is his name?” I persisted. “His nickname is ‘Jesus,’” David said out of the side of his mouth, hoping that the others sitting there had not heard him reveal all. “But he won’t want to see you.” “Why don’t you ask him? If you’re going to be a Christian, you can’t follow two different leaders called Jesus. You must decide which one.””[1] She wanted to meet Jesus to let him know that David was no longer going to be in his gang and that he was leaving the crime behind to follow the real Jesus. In doing so, she shared the gospel with Jesus and he accepted Christ and told all of his “disciples” and they wanted to meet with her to hear the gospel also. Not only did they accept Christ but they received the gift of speaking in tongues. The chapter continues to go on about how more and more drug lords were having her preach in their dens and peoples lives were being transformed and changed.

As I read this it actually encouraged me and reminded me that it is the work of God that brings forth salvation. Our participation is just to be bold and willing to share the gospel with everyone and let them know “Yeh sou ngoi nei”- Jesus Loves You! Jackie’s stories and dedication to minister in Hong Kong has truly blessed me. We are all called to be a vessel and a bearer of the kingdom. The great commission is for all of us not a certain few. We all have a part to play in making sure that everyone all over the world has had a chance to hear the gospel of Jesus Christ. If you have read the news recently, there has been much chatter about american mega pastors soliciting funds to purchase million dollar planes “for evangelism”. Yet I read a portion of Jackie’s story where she caught the minibus and walked long miles in the streets to meet people and share the gospel message. It proves that the gospel is complete in and of itself. It does not need any grandstanding. Just an open and willing servant to say “send me lord I will go”!

[1] Jackie Pullinger et al., Chasing the Dragon (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2010), 135.

 

About the Author

Christal Jenkins Tanks

5 responses to ““Yeh sou ngoi nei”- Jesus Loves You!”

  1. Jim Sabella says:

    “The great commission is for all of us not a certain few. We all have a part to play in making sure that everyone all over the world has had a chance to hear the gospel of Jesus Christ.”

    Christal, I agree and well said. Access is an important missiological discussion and one that is being discussed regularly. For example, if a person has heard gospel once, have we done our job as the church? That is an important question for today with so many having access to the gospel via our interconnectedness. And yet, there are still those who have little or no access to the gospel. Thanks for your post.

  2. Christal, you said: If you have read the news recently, there has been much chatter about american mega pastors soliciting funds to purchase million dollar planes “for evangelism”.’

    Am I to understand that you don’t think this makes sense? Um, I NEED my plane! FOR THE GOSPEL!

    That stuff really infuriates me, not so much because pastors can’t have nice things (I think they can, although a plane?), but because of the bald faced lie, based in greed, spoken in the name of the gospel.
    I think there is an argument to be made that you need a little bit of Paul to be an effective pastor (i.e. all things to all people).
    So, for instance, if half of the members of your church belong to the local country club, if you wouldn’t be comfortable there and wouldn’t be able to ‘fit in’ or interact there (or if as one of our other cohort pointed out: if you don’t genuinely love them) then it is going to be difficult to truly minister to them.

    But there is a world of difference between being able to walk in and ‘blend in’ in a country club (or whatever) and claiming a ‘need’ for your own private jet.

    As you point out, if you are seeking the Lord’s will and doing the work that God has called you to, you will likely have what you need. But, that divine providence most often looks like the hard work you describe:
    ‘Yet I read a portion of Jackie’s story where she caught the minibus and walked long miles in the streets to meet people and share the gospel message. It proves that the gospel is complete in and of itself. It does not need any grandstanding. Just an open and willing servant to say “send me lord I will go”!

  3. mm Katy Drage Lines says:

    Succinctly well said, Christal. My stomach turns at the “pastors” who solicit funds for their own glory and comfort. But what it ultimately comes down to is fruit. What do we harvest? Through the many, many years of Pullinger’s faithfulness– and others who share the work with her– lives have been changed, hope and healing received through the power of the Spirit of Jesus. Thanks for highlighting the faithfulness– and multiplication– of Pullinger!

  4. Mary Walker says:

    I was very convicted about my own ease and comfort reading Jackie’s story, Christal. I don’t think everyone is called to the same kind of places, but airplanes!!!
    I agree with you. Everyone is a missionary. “We are all called to be a vessel and a bearer of the kingdom.” What a wonderful blessing for us and a super last advance as we connect with someone who is giving her all for the Lord Jesus and so that others may know Him.

  5. Kristin Hamilton says:

    You know, Christal, I am so tired of people acting like God’s ventriloquist! Of course the whole private jet thing was ridiculous, but there are so many spiritual leaders out there claiming much more subtle “truths” that God has spoken and misleading their followers.
    My biggest take away from the story you mentioned is that we can only serve one “Jesus.” If the Jesus a leader claims to speak for sounds like a criminal and abuses his followers, he’s probably a counterfeit.

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