DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

The Forging of a Servant’s Heart

By: on March 15, 2021

We like to gloss over the hard parts of life, move quickly through them, or avoid them at all cost. We focus on the successes, forgetting failures, disappointments, and deaths mold and shape us just as much as the successes. This reality is evident when high school students apply for college, as applicants are encouraged…

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Power, Creativity, Leadership, and the Spirit

By: on March 15, 2021

I’ve been spending a lot of time meditating and studying one of Cru’s seminal texts, Ephesians 5:18, as I review Simon Walker’s thoughts on leadership and power in Leading with Nothing to Lose. I humbly offer encouragement to how I see it shaping the Innovation department within my organization. I have been guilty of previously…

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Un-

By: on March 13, 2021

The genuine article is a kind of person who exhibits a nature that does not need to be defended. Henri Nouwen, mystic and servant of the disabled-forgotten, writes of the surrendered life, of those who’ve been set free from shame to love, in his book ‘With Open Hands’. He encourages the prayerful life as one…

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Speed of the Leader, Speed of the Team

By: on March 10, 2021

Over the course of this semester, I have looked at four US presidents through the lenses of leadership style and emotional intelligence. As I return to Simon Walker’s “The Undefended Leader” trilogy, I decided to continue with the thread of his different leadership strategies by looking at a former British Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill…

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Foundations

By: on March 10, 2021

The book The Undefended Leader was written by Simon P. Walker as a product of a course he developed and taught at Wycliffe Hall at Oxford University. He is an ordained Anglican Vicar, professor and an executive coach. His book is made up of three smaller books, Leading out of Who You Are, Leading with…

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On Exhaustion, Fear, and Defensive Posturing

By: on March 9, 2021

I’ve been working toward advanced educational degrees for seven years. Life has changed in many ways. My daughter was 14 and my son was 10 when I began my seminary journey. With a large measure of God’s grace, my daughter is now 21 and in her last year of college; my son is 17 and…

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Leaders as Dragon-Slayers

By: on March 9, 2021

There is a cave on a farm in the hills just outside of Bethlehem that is among the most transformational locations for me in the world. It’s a cave that has been hand dug by a family of Palestinian Christians because they were denied permission and permits by the Israeli government to build structures on…

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When Heroes Fall

By: on March 8, 2021

There’s an old saying that goes, “Don’t ever meet your heroes.” The theory goes that the moment you actually meet the people you admire most, you’ll come to find they aren’t what you always thought they would be.  This is a common trope that has made it into various forms of media – that moment…

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The Strength of Weak Ties

By: on March 8, 2021

My attention has been captured by the research around social capital. As Robert Putnam painstakingly and thoroughly popularizes the use of the term in Bowling Alone, leadership scholars like Simon Walker also find it helpful as they address a way forward in the future. I’ll briefly address Walker’s use of the term and investigate social…

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gorillas, penguins and turtles

By: on March 5, 2021

It is difficult to listen to someone who is pushing an opinion that does not fit with one’s own worldview or, be it, one’s own preferred way-of-seeing. Michael Shellenberger, acclaimed environmental activist, a recovered vegetarian and proponent of nuclear energy, is the author of the book ‘Apocalypse Never’. The book, though chalk-full of reference notes…

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Snappy Slogans and Conversation Stoppers

By: on March 4, 2021

In the introduction to his book, “Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All,” Michael Shellenberger says that he wrote the book “because the conversation about climate change and the environment has, in the last few years, spiraled out of control.”[1] His general thesis is that extremist activists, organizations, and efforts can actually do more…

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Steady On

By: on March 2, 2021

When we die, we want to believe our time here on this earth was worth something, that we had a purpose and made a difference. In Apocalypse Never, Michael Shellenberger notes, “…secular people are attracted to apocalyptic environmentalism because it meets the same psychological and spiritual needs as Judeo-Christianity and other religions. Apocalyptic environmentalism gives…

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Fear, Alone

By: on March 1, 2021

Dorothy Day, in her earlier years an anarchist, in her memoir ‘A Long Loneliness’, often references the thought and political ideologies of 18th Century socialist revolutionary, Karl Marx. She reflects with a surprising tenderness on ‘the Marxist slogan, “Workers of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains.’1 She felt connected to…

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Sound the Alarms

By: on March 1, 2021

When you think of alarms, what do you think of? At first glance, perhaps it’s that dreaded morning “wake up alarm” when your phone sounds off like death siren screaming at the top of its lungs at you. Maybe you think of an alarm as a warning of something bad is about to happen. We…

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A Word of Caution to the Alarmists

By: on March 1, 2021

In blending together research data, policy analysis, and learnings from a rich history of environmental justice movements, Michael Shellenberger makes a compelling and surprising argument for why the environmentalists are hurting more than helping.[1]  Put simply, he argues in Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All that the important work of environmentalism is being…

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Apocalypse Never: Can Eco-Theolgy Help?

By: on March 1, 2021

In the book Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All, the author Michael Shellenberger, a self-proclaimed environmental activist, tries to bring a voice of reason to an emotional explosive topic. His desire is to not only protect the environment but obtain what he states as “universal prosperity for all people.” He believes all scientists…

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Generosity and Curiosity

By: on March 1, 2021

Discovering and uncovering the driving questions of leaders and thinkers fascinate me. Behind most divisive topics usually lies a driving question best attributed to the fields of philosophy, ethics, and religion. Here I will make a brief argument broadly for the arena of underlying questions, then specifically through the issue of environmentalism with the artifact…

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Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?

By: on February 25, 2021

Doris Kearns Goodwin closes her book, “Leadership in Turbulent Times,” with a chapter called, “Of Death and Remembrance.” She spends a few pages on each of the presidents featured in her book writing about the circumstances of their leaving the presidency and the impact their term had on the nation. Two of the presidents profiled…

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Legacy: A Life of Impact

By: on February 24, 2021

Each individual, in one sense or another, wants to leave a legacy. They want to put their signature stamp on the future and impact generations to come. Some do it consciously, some unconsciously. We all want our lives to matter. We hope that in some small way we make a difference to those around us.…

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The Cloud of Witnesses

By: on February 23, 2021

At Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s funeral service, Franz Hildebrandt recalled a conversation he had with Bonhoeffer: “Why should it always have to be the bad people who make the revolutions?”[1] The word “revolution” carries with it many connotations. For Americans, we may think of the American Revolution and the spirit of nationalism it evokes as cries of…

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