DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Sundays Go to the Highest Bidder

By: on February 11, 2020

As the husband grabs his bible and a cup of coffee he yells out to his wife. “Hurry up honey, we’re going to be late for church!”  “Coming!” she responds with her Bible under her arm as she grabs her cup of coffee. “I am looking forward to finishing up this sermon series on the…

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Imagination: A survey and analysis of Dr. Jason Clark’s use of the word

By: on February 11, 2020

The imagination is a powerful spiritual faculty. It allows humans to evaluate what is and envision what could be. Alternate future realities (what could be) exist only in and because of our prophetic imaginations. Furthermore, imaginations provide individual identity and construct social connection, communities, and orient our spiritual formation. For CS Lewis, the imagination is…

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Torture and Eucharist

By: on February 10, 2020

The In Torture and Eucharist, William Cavanaugh examines the torture that took place under General Pinochet in Chile caught my attention because is a very controversial observation of the Eucharist. General Pinochet was a Chilean dictator who took power after overthrowing President-elect Salvador Allende and who ruled Chile between 1973 and 1990, harshly repressing the…

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Seeking to Understand Postmodernists

By: on February 10, 2020

Stephen Ronald Craig Hicks (born August 19, 1960) is a Canadian-American philosopher. He is a Professor of Philosophy at Rockford University, Illinois. Hicks is the author of four books and a documentary. His Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault argues that postmodernism is best understood as a rhetorical strategy of intellectuals and academics on the far-left of the political…

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In the Market for a New Church

By: on February 10, 2020

At the beginning of his dissertation, Evangelicalism and Capitalism, Dr. Jason Clark asks this question: “Has my church, and my Evangelical kin, become captive to a mode of ‘dispensing religious goods and services’ to consuming participants?”[1]  Recently I have had several conversations with my housemates about what we have been studying in regards to capitalism…

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Mapping theories to a healthy arrival

By: on February 10, 2020

Dr. Clark’s project provides a critical thesis that “deployed its own ‘map-making method as a kind of heuristic concept map to trace correspondence between church acts and beliefs. This ‘map-making’ ensures that the thesis provides evaluation and resourcing for deployment to current and related Evangelical contexts. Second, the thesis proposes that, contrary to methodological worries…

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Humanities 101

By: on February 9, 2020

Much of my memory of college is a blur. I remember the campus at Michigan State University and how cold it was during the winter. One of the things I remember is walking across a section of campus nicknamed the Frozen Tundra to get to humanities class on the south campus. I do not remember…

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‘I’ love Christmas

By: on February 9, 2020

“Is it possible to overcome Western, white cultural captivity and pursue a biblical model of economic justice?” Soong-Chan Rah, [1]. $20. This is the amount gas that I put in my gas tank every time I stop at the station, whatever amount buys $20 worth. I do this for two reasons. The first is that…

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The Failure Of Leadership Is Too Costly.

By: on February 9, 2020

This quote has been attributed to bill Gates, “Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they cannot loose”. Humility is a great virtue that enables leaders to learn from failures and make corrective measures but pride is a great source of failure in leadership. Our egoistic pursuit of success can easily…

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Steak and Beer? Social Constructs or Philosophical Pragmatism

By: on February 9, 2020

In the early 2000’s I had a lengthy conversation with a returned missionary who was ‘reconfiguring’ her faith. At the root of that reconfiguration was her study on Heideggerian Hermeneutics. The mere title was enough to get me very excited; I mean who doesn’t go all gooey at the thought of Martin Heidegger. I was…

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Fear Not: Intersections and Opportunities in Postmodernism

By: on February 8, 2020

Up front let me acknowledge that I am a middle-aged, caucasian,  female, Christian from Canada. This is inescapably the subjective space from which I encounter the world. I recognize that I have  inherited privilege and power because of these identities. These details don’t solely define me and there are many more that would offer more…

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Fullness or Dichotomy

By: on February 7, 2020

This week’s reading, Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault  has been a struggle. While I understand how this book can be helpful and useful in certain contexts, I struggled to relate to this book on a personal, academic, or professional level. From reading reviews, it seems as though I am not the…

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The Gift of Limits

By: on February 7, 2020

Reading philosophy tends to make this student reflective with more questions than answers. This was certainly the case this week while reading Hicks’ Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault. Stephen R.C. Hicks is professor of philosophy at Rockford University, where he is also Executive Director of the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship.…

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The Repair or Replace Conundrum

By: on February 6, 2020

I have become quite fond of a show on Netflix called The Repair Shop, which originally aired on the BBC in the UK. The Repair Shop exists on the property of the Weald and Downland Living Museum in West Sussex,i where a group of craftspeople have come together to fix treasured antiques of all sorts.…

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The Mandorla (as Opposed to the Mandalorian)

By: on February 6, 2020

In Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rosseau to Foucault, Dr. Hicks wants his reader to understand the dangers of postmodern thought and of its ends being nihilism, socialism and chaos, to name a few.[1] Here I thought I was more postmodern than modern because of my Generation X affiliation, my love for the coffee scene…

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Would-Be Clashes and Resonances: Apologetics to Gen Z

By: on February 6, 2020

As I was scanning my notes in preparation for writing this blog post I realized the dizzying array of options available to me. I thought it was comforting and reassuring that I’d get this piece quickly written, given the wealth of source material available in Stephen R.C. Hicks’ Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau…

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The Classroom Remembered

By: on February 6, 2020

In my second year of graduate school (the early 2000s), I took a course titled, Ministry in Emerging Culture. It was full of mostly potential church planters who were preparing to plant churches in various contexts within the US. The “emerging church” movement was brand new, and discussion centered around what ministry would look like…

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Postmodernism, Maybe It’s Not So Bad After All.

By: on February 6, 2020

The general agreement suggests that we live in a postmodern context.[1] Stephen R. C. Hicks is a Canadian American philosopher. He teaches at Rockford University, where he also directs the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship. In his book, Explaining Postmodernism, he seeks to trace the origins of our current intellectual way of thinking.  As Marcus…

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