DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Herding and the Socialized Mind

By: on October 19, 2019

As an ordained rabbi, family therapist, and leadership consultant, Edwin H. Friedman tapped into the emotional processes within society describing the failure of nerve in leaders as a result. According to Friedman, leadership is often neutralized by four emotional responses: reactivity, herding, blame displacement and a quick-fix mentality. The characteristics that define herding in highly…

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Great Things Don’t Come From Comfort Zones.

By: on October 19, 2019

“The comfort zone is a psychological state in which one feels familiar, safe, secure and at ease. If you always do what is easy and choose the path of least resistance, you never step outside your comfort zone. Great things don’t come from comfort zones.”[1] We’re operating in a world of safety and comfort, where…

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Sabotage

By: on October 18, 2019

Shadow of an old woman with a tea kettle The word sabotage always brings to mind espionage or even, intrigue. It is the act of someone ruining an event or project for the sole purpose of stopping advancement or progress. Many times when things go wrong at work or in ministry, the thought of sabotage comes to my mind. Ministry is supposed to be…

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Of Water and Leadership

By: on October 18, 2019

Water is an amazing thing. It can dissolve more substances than any solvent – including very caustic acids. It cannot be compressed making it usable as a both a weapon and a tool, it is able to sooth burns, can absorb an outrageous amount of energy before changing states and is the most important ingredient…

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Sitting in the Winner’s Circle

By: on October 18, 2019

Perspective – do you see yourself as a victim or a survivor? This is the key to healing – and also the key to leadership. I often paint for my clients a picture of them in the winner’s circle. Zig Ziglar once said that if you don’t see yourself as a winner, then you cannot perform…

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Nuanced Juxtapositions

By: on October 17, 2019

O wow! Reading Edwin Friedman’s A Failure of Nerve was like drinking from a fire hydrant — there’s just so much to assimilate. I found myself highlighting many parts, frequently re-reading sections, trying to comprehend his ideas about leadership. Then there were the familiar concepts we’re told not to emulate, such as empathy and togetherness1.…

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Responsibility Greater Than Empathy?

By: on October 17, 2019

I have taken my time with A Failure of Nerve and dismissed all the usual reading hacks for this one. I decided this summer that this would be one I would read and digest slowly based on the high recommendation from several mentors. I have not been disappointed. I am benefiting from Friedman’s thoughts on…

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Thoughts from the Grave

By: on October 17, 2019

A Failure of Nerve: Leadership in the Age of the Quick Fix was written ten years after Edwin Friedman’s death by permission of his family trust along with the editorial work of Margaret W. Treadwell and Edward W. Beal.[1] At its core, the book is an attempt to apply the societal regression theory of Murray Bowen…

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Leader, Control Thyself

By: on October 17, 2019

It was a number of years ago now, while watching a parenting video, when the teacher informed me that my first job as a parent was to be in control of myself.[1] Our home was often wrought with anxiety as we navigated layers of challenging circumstances. I remember thinking of my emotional, rambunctious, sometimes rebellious…

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Be Different.

By: on October 17, 2019

In 1983, Apple launched its computer Lisa, and the last project Jobs worked on before he was let go. Jobs released Lisa with a nine-page ad in the New York Times spelling out the computer’s technical features. It was nine pages of geek talk nobody outside NASA was interested in. The computer bombed. When Jobs…

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Leading without an ETA

By: on October 16, 2019

I am grateful for GPS. It gives me turn-by-turn directions, but it also gives me an estimated time of arrival. I can even let my GPS know when I need to arrive at a destination, and I will be notified when I need to leave. Since I live in an urban area that is under…

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Because of God (and Friedman) Leaders Need Not Give Into Fear

By: on October 16, 2019

Edwin Friedman (1932-1996) was a practicing family therapist, leadership consultant, and ordained rabbi (Reform Judaism). Friedman applied his four-decade work with family systems thinking to leadership applications.  His innovative perspective on leadership was more about a way of thinking and being than about traditional leadership technique emphases. Because of his innovative approach to leadership, his…

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Building Our Nerve

By: on October 16, 2019

I took our weekly Zoom call this week while I was on the road, somewhere in rural Virginia.  “Zooming in” from my phone does not allow me to see everyone’s face at the same time, nor does it allow me to reply to the chat messages I receive (public, private or otherwise!) as quickly as…

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The Golden Road of Hospitality

By: on October 14, 2019

As I sit to write this post there is a new meme online where the President of the United States goes on a shooting rampage in a church killing all those who oppose him. It is in every way vile. There are many things that could be said about it, but mostly I wonder what…

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Looking for the Centre

By: on October 13, 2019

I recently returned from a trip to London and Oxford. This was my first proper trip to England and I went with a deep curiosity of what might feel familiar to my Canadian/Australian experiences and what would seem different. I would compare my sentiments to those of trying to understand my parents. While they are…

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Economic and Political Blocks

By: on October 13, 2019

It is incredible how Peter Frankopan, a senior research fellow at Worcester College, Oxford, and a historian, brings out the silk road world model that is taking shape and has been from the ancient period. Just as the Quaker church has been evolving from its inception of the 17th century, the silk road has also…

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World History: Another Perspective

By: on October 12, 2019

As a youth, Peter Frankopan was disenchanted by the version of history he learned as he studied the map of the world. Frankopan was uneasy about the relentlessly narrow geographic focus of his classes at school, which concentrated solely on western Europe and the United States and left most of the rest of the world…

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Whereisthatistan?

By: on October 12, 2019

Until recently, writing history without acknowledging ones cultural biases was a relatively simple matter. Now, however, in the age of the internet and global perspectives, such actions are not only unacceptable, but they are also immediately challengeable. This blog site we write in is live to the world, and it is read, analysed and critiqued…

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New (Perspectives) Require Releasing the Old

By: on October 11, 2019

Frankopan’s The Silk Roads: A New History of the World links ancient Greece and Rome to what we now call the Middle East (perhaps more accurately the Near East). After that, Frankopan locates the geographical and historical strategic epicenter of the globe somewhere between the Middle East and Central Asia. These two areas were linked…

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