DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

Leadership and Vulnerability

on April 14, 2019

Brene Brown has touched the core of failure in our leadership. In her book “Dare to Lead: Brave Work, Tough Conversation, Whole Hearts,”  she surprises many by encouraging them to learn how to fail and fall. She also introduces very well what breaks or build us strong is vulnerability. It is defined as the emotion…

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Vulnerability

on April 12, 2019

Vulnerability is a word I have always had trouble pronouncing and sometimes difficulty practicing. Growing up in an urban environment, vulnerability was associated with weakness and weakness will get you killed. It is not that I grew up in such a bad neighborhood, but it is just that vulnerability implies trust, and trust is not…

9 Comments

Daring Leadership

on April 12, 2019

Leadership holds a different meaning for me today than it did a few years ago when I was serving as Director of the American Red Cross, Director of the Kalamazoo Gospel Mission, and finally Director of the Kalamazoo Prayer Center – all over a 20-year span. Back then, leadership to me meant “expert of everything,…

5 Comments

Learn to Rise Before Learning to be Brave

on April 12, 2019

Brown’s Dare to Lead describes the four skills needed to become a courageous leader. The first skill is Rumbling with Vulnerability. Brown had assumed that the biggest barrier to courageous leadership would be fear, but her research indicated that fear is not a barrier. The real barrier is how people armor themselves to deal with fear. Curiosity…

12 Comments

Like Silk Sheets

on April 11, 2019

I can understand why Brené Brown is so popular. The women in my life have been harassing me for some time that I need to watch Brown speaking on vulnerability through her TED Talk.[1] That led me to scan through Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent,…

8 Comments

The Phone Call

on April 11, 2019

Today, I was belittled on the phone. A man, whom I’ll call Ted, had a problem with his daughter going on the mission trip my office is organizing. More specifically, he had a problem with the money his daughter is raising to go on the mission trip my office is organizing. Ted felt that it…

12 Comments

Worms, Cracks and Wholeheartedness

on April 11, 2019

Brené Brown is a shame and vulnerability research professor that I have been casually following for some years. Her Dare to Lead book is the recent offering of her research to the workplace. It seems slightly counter-cultural to bring these subjects to work and yet I think we are desperate for it. When it comes…

11 Comments

Let’s rumble!

on April 11, 2019

Dare to Lead was my introduction to Brene Brown, and I was excited to dive in having heard great things about her work. I was not disappointed. Brown, a research professor from the University of Houston, challenged me with a new glossary of terms, offering that leaders must be brave enough to be vulnerable as…

12 Comments

Elephant Fights and Values

on April 11, 2019

“Why do you hate me?” My father said abruptly to me. It was late and we were the last people up in the house. I was a bit stunned by the question. My dad would proceed to tell me why Jen and I adopting was spitting in his face. I was shocked and frustrated with…

9 Comments

Leading Wide Open

on April 11, 2019

Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.[1] Dare to lead wide opened! Leading wide open takes courage, wisdom, and heart. Courage to walk into uncharted territories that may not make sense but trusting in the outcome no matter how it unfolds. Wisdom to uncover…

4 Comments

Leaders Are Humans

on April 11, 2019

Brené Brown is an American research professor in The Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston and continues her excellent work towards improving the lives of people in her work, Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts. Grounded in scientific research that surveyed 150 global C-suite executives, Brown’s findings are rich and…

5 Comments

The Leader as Midwife

on April 11, 2019

It’s been almost 9 years since I first clicked on a link that introduced me to Brené Brown, a qualitative researcher who began in the field of social work who also happens to be Episcopalian[1] . In her first viral Ted Talk, she explores shame and resilience. She defines shame as the feeling that “I’m…

5 Comments

The Treasure in the Cave

on April 10, 2019

Being a conference junkie for more than thirty years, I found myself burned out with the idea of one more registration confirmation in my inbox, just as a friend who works with Patrick Lencioni’s Table Group, began prodding me and our team to come to The Unconference. How could I politely get out of this…

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It’s Getting Real

on April 10, 2019

In my line of work I get to spend a lot of time with apologists who travel locally and internationally training men and women to defend the truth claims of Christianity in an increasingly secularized world. I’m in their company quite a bit and so inevitably I get lumped in with them. Each time that…

10 Comments

What can BRAVING do for you?

on April 9, 2019

I was recently having a discussion with a local interim minister.  In the PCUSA, interim ministers are often called to serve a congregation during the “in between” time, the time a church takes after a pastor leaves and before they call a new pastor.  These interim ministers are specially trained in systems and family theory,…

7 Comments

Effective Leadership Stems From Within.

on April 8, 2019

There is more to leadership than the external level or the outward expression as is conventionally know through performance, passion, power, motivation, knowledge, skills and the like. There is something that is more foundational to leadership in ‘the person’ of the leader, leadership is essentially who you are and there is no dichotomy between who…

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Community and Morality in Africa

on April 7, 2019

When we were growing up in our communities, we grew up under instructional guidance of the “do not” and “dos.” Sometimes they would give you explanations and sometimes they would not explain the reason. For example, girls were not allowed to climb trees. It was not morally right for them to climb trees especially when…

3 Comments

Elephants, Chimpanzees and Bees

on April 7, 2019

The degree of WEIRDness (western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic) we are, determines the depth of autonomy, individualization and independence revealed in our perspectives and confirmation biases. This concept described by Jonathan Haidt in The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, seems to read like a diary of his own…

4 Comments