DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

I’m Proud to Be A Missionary

on June 28, 2018

I am a missionary. Through the years, many people have asked me—what exactly does a missionary do? Some ask for information purposes others are curious and still others, well let’s just say they can be somewhat less friendly. With the book Boxes and Saints in mind, here is my response.  At the core of my…

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Boxers & Saints: Homestretch Haikus

on June 28, 2018

  Boxers[1] Bean garden revenge Op’ra gods fear foreign devils Storied people lost.           Saints[2] Named but confused faith St Joan guides and inspires her Sacrificed, she saves.         Epilogue More than religion Into church come thieves, murd’rs To West-branded faith.     [1] Gene Luen Yang, Boxers…

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Those Who Love

on June 27, 2018

Once upon a time a boxer and a saint fight screams! Death to the saint.   Fires rage, saints die boxers rage more war with saints seas of blood run wide.   Saints love orphans well. Boxers kill the ones who love. Who is left to love?   A country mourns deep as the ones…

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HEROES – COMIC STRIP CHARACTERS

on June 27, 2018

   Most children want to be superheroes. During my childhood, we had Superman, Batman, Underdog, and Wonder Woman. Young boys were tying a towel around their neck jumping off of chairs or out of windows to immolate flying. For Batman, it was making the sound “Dudududududududu Batman!” with their sidekick Robin. And of course, Underdog!…

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Boxers and Saints – Death to Life

on June 27, 2018

For China?! What is China but a people and their stories?[1]            Mei-wen to Bao   Gene Luen Yang, a practicing Roman Catholic grew up in a Chinese American Catholic community in the Bay Area. He felt that Christianity and Chinese culture seemed to go hand-in-hand. His Chinese neighborhood served as…

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The Gospel According to Vibiana

on June 26, 2018

China has a long history with Christianity.  With written records going back over 4,000 years, it is one of the great ancient civilizations that is still in existence.   Missionaries love to point out that the written Chinese language consists of word pictures (think hieroglyphics).  Some of these word pictures mimic stories in the book…

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Boxers in Brief Rebellion

on June 26, 2018

Given permission to write this week’s post about Boxers and Saints, by Gene Luen Yang, in Haiku form, that’s what I am doing!   Saint of Four Girl faith, Martyred at Little Bao’s hand; Champions, at what cost?   And with that, the final blog post for my DMin coursework is complete! I will continue to post…

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Historical Markers Along the Road

on June 21, 2018

As you travel on the backroads in the eastern parts of Europe you will often see a small chapel right in the middle of the field. The chapels are made of stone and brick maybe 4 feet by 4 feet by 7 feet high, usually in the form of a grotto. Many of them are…

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The Heart of Worship

on June 20, 2018

  What is worship? I have seen a lot of things which are called “worship,” that are less than inspirational. A visit to a large Church in America might expose you to a carefully prepared performance by talented soloists, backed by professional musicians who are paid to play at their “church gig” every Sunday. Some…

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Women Who Loved Greatly and Fought Bravely

on June 20, 2018

What an amazing story of China’s history seen through the lens of multi-generational women. The trials and hardships they experienced were intense, as they were often traded, oppressed, and marginalized like objects. The resiliency of each woman was impressive and inspirational as they survived torture, war, cultural oppression, and abusive relationships while taking care of…

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Generational Legacy

on June 20, 2018

    Author Juno Chang, in her book Wild Swans, she shares her family story.  She reveals a great love story although torn with problems yet overthrown with love. Who doesn’t like a good love story?  Her grandmother was given to General Xua as a cumberbine. This was not acceptable to her, but she had…

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Wild Swans: Repeating History

on June 20, 2018

“Let me become a cat or a dog, but not a woman”[1] Throughout the narrative telling of twentieth-century Chinese history, we observe the move from traditional society to idealistic Communism, on to the Cultural Revolution—a power-centric second iteration of Communism, and the messy outcomes of years of distrust and revenge. Jung Chang’s Wild Swans: Three…

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Can We See Ourselves Here?

on June 19, 2018

There is no way to capture the sadness, disgust, awe, and prophetic fear I felt when I read Jung Chang’s Wild Swans. This is what rolled through me when I tried:   “We are so much better, so much more civilized;” Western eyes roll in disgust; Atrocities through three generations; But don’t we have our…

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My first encounter with Hong Kong

on June 17, 2018

I was reflecting upon my early years. One of my best friends in elementary school had family from Hong Kong. They were a very well to do family. They moved into a very affluent community and lived their lives in a very traditional manner. Her parents rarely showed affection for one another. I always knew…

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Hong Kong: It’s Complicated

on June 14, 2018

As I sit down to write about the history of Hong Kong, it would be easy to put a black hat on Great Britain and a white hat on China.   England is often cast in the role of the power-hungry colonizer who sent ships across the world in order to take advantage of less powerful…

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