DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

An Everyone Culture in the Church

By: on January 14, 2021

Just as a body, though one, has many parts, but all its many parts form one body, so it is with Christ. – 1 Corinthians 12:12 (NIV) What does it mean to be an “deliberately developmental organization?” Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey’s “An Everyone Culture: Becoming a Deliberately Developmental Organization” is an examination of…

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The Value of Disruptions

By: on January 13, 2021

It appears that the average person spends 13 years and 2 months of their adult life at work. If they work consistent overtime, another 1 year and 2 months can be added to that number. On the other hand, it appears we spend only around 328 days in our lifetime socializing with friends.[1] When crunching…

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The Importance of Checking Our Blind Spots

By: on January 12, 2021

“Brake” “Braaaake” “Ian, BRAKE!” These are the words I spoke to my 15-year-old, newly permitted driver as he remained ever focused on the left and right lanes before him but failed to check his blind spot and see the semi-truck he was about to merge into as he drove on the I-205 to I-5 on…

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Wonder and Rigor: The Challenge of Increasing Innovation Capabilities

By: on January 12, 2021

Culture eats strategy for breakfast (so the oft-used adage goes). In my personal research, Cru’s field staff unanimously point to culture as an impediment for innovating within their ministry. When asked how to make these changes, many shake their heads, throw up their arms, sigh, and relent, “I don’t know. Culture change is hard and…

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Embrace

By: on January 11, 2021

Around the world, one can find proverbs and idioms that effectively speak the same message: “The nail that sticks out gets hammered down.” “The first bird that leaves the nest gets shot.” “Don’t go against the grain” “The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.” The primary message: Don’t stand…

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From D3EO to DDO: An Important Journey for Every Leader

By: on January 11, 2021

A successful organization is not the one that consumes its employees in order to propel its mission. Rather, according to authors Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey in An Everyone Culture: Becoming a Deliberately Developmental Organization, a successful organization is one that is proactive in providing meaning for its employees. The authors assert that the…

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When Not Knowing and Not Doing are Not Options

By: on November 30, 2020

A hacker got on to the Zoom call of an all-church meeting we had last Sunday. We were running the meeting from our church building, with about twenty-five people physically present and the rest on the call. My immediate supervisor was also on hand to preside. Our Associate Pastor was handling technical support from his…

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Letting Go

By: on November 19, 2020

In “Not Doing,” D’Souza and Renner quote Hermann Hesse who is thought to have said, “some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.”[1] I will never forget an experience in my early adolescence in which a group of us had the opportunity to learn how to rappel down…

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Norco

By: on November 18, 2020

I left them there. It was ‘Norco’ and a younger friend, huddled in the freezing, out-of-the-wet, door-front area of our Market. Jumped into my little Trax and was about to get going but, couldn’t. Pulled up behind an RV that had pulled-in for the night, ran back into the Sanctuary, off-the-alarm for a couple bags…

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A/The (?) Path Through the Unknown

By: on November 17, 2020

Of the many conributions Renner & D’Souza have made to my leadership philosophy this semester, one stands out: the future is shaped by the leader’s response to the unknown. This past weekend, I took some time of silent reflection in the moutains of southwest Orgeon. There were three locations I wanted to explore as I…

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Does Pace Really Matter?

By: on November 17, 2020

Steven D’Souza and Diana Renner, in their book Not Doing, discuss the idea that not doing is not necessarily a lack of activity. They bring in Carl Honore’s work on slow movement. Honore presents the premise that slow movement is all about pace; a pace that requires us to know the conditions in which we…

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Transformation

By: on November 16, 2020

The Towers stretch high into the sky as I pass through the city gates. Guardsmen who I recognize bow to me not out of recognition, but out of courtesy for a visitor to the City of Towers. I walk the streets that I once knew, everything exactly as I had left it and yet completely…

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Jumping into Serendipitous Grace

By: on November 16, 2020

My spiritual directee arrived ten minutes late.[1] I had already spent 20 minutes trying to settle my new puppy into her crate with treats and such but was unsuccessful. By the time the spiritual direction session began, my pup was still losing her puppy mind with separation anxiety, and I was super distracted. I just…

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Neurological Entrenchment

By: on November 16, 2020

Early on in the shelter-in-place days, I discovered some beautiful running trails just minutes from my house. Each morning in this refuge, I would watch the sunrise, wonder, think, and pray for the potential of a new day. Waist-high grass stood on either side of the single-track trails. Alternating between running and biking, this routine…

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now or never nothing

By: on November 12, 2020

Darkness. I remember running in the darkness. Headlamps and heatwaves in the cold, striding down a mountain a few years ago. We rounded a corner, I recall and, coming quick with the gravity, we were stopped by eyes staring out at us from the dark. They seemed to be those of a fairly large mammal,…

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All That Matters

By: on November 12, 2020

When I arrived at my present pastoral assignment 3½ years ago, one of my first endeavors was a series of small group meetings with members of the congregation. We called it a “Listening Tour” and over the course of two weeks, my wife and I met in over a dozen homes in gatherings of ten…

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A Both/And of Transformation

By: on November 12, 2020

When I was nine years old, I was in Florida with my family on the first non-National Park vacation we’d ever taken. While the theme parks that promised magical memories held up to their end of the bargain, it was something that I observed in the night sky (for free) that changed my life. NASA…

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On Fear and War and Dying with Honor**

By: on November 10, 2020

We are a nation built on war. Through war we earned our independence. Through war we maintain power and position around the world. The warrior spirit is woven into the very fibers of our American being. But with war, comes inevitable death. Historically, psychological principles are utilized to mitigate the fear of death in war.…

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The Arrival

By: on November 9, 2020

The boat gently bumps into the shore, waking me from my slumber.  I sit up, the fog not as thick as it once was. A smile creeps on my face as I disembark onto the shore, seeing a rough path ahead of me. It isn’t easy going, but I find that it doesn’t bother me.…

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Wandering

By: on November 9, 2020

When was the last time you just let your mind wander? When was the last time you took the time to wander around while driving, just to see a part of the city you never saw before? Sometimes it pays to wander. My wife and I normally take an annual road trip to Texas to…

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