DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

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Mark Noll and Peter Enns walk into a bar . . .

By: on January 23, 2020

Mark Noll keeps the Canadian connection alive, as all of our authors so far this semester have strong ties to Jenn’s motherland.  Mark Noll, former Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, is current Professor of History at Regent College in Vancouver.  A prolific author, and high achieving academic, perhaps his most impressive…

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What is the Stupid Economy and What Do We Do About It?

By: on January 23, 2020

When political strategist James Carville coined the phrase, “the economy, stupid” during Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential election campaign, he was creating messaging to link the policies of the White House to a voter’s pocketbook. President George H.W. Bush was facing an economic recession and running for a second term. Third-party candidate Ross Perot used charts…

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The Mourning and the Moving On

By: on January 23, 2020

In his book The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind Mark Noll is quick to admit that the scandal is in fact the lack of an Evangelical mind.i Tracing much of the issue back to Evangelicalism’s fundamentalist roots he mourns the lack of desire to explore how the many facets of God relate to the world.…

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What’s In It For Me?

By: on January 22, 2020

“Some people say a man is made outta mud A poor man’s made outta muscle and blood Muscle and blood and skin and bones A mind that’s a-weak and a back that’s strong   You load sixteen tons, what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt Saint Peter don’t you call me…

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The Great (Teleological) Transformation (of Innovation)

By: on January 21, 2020

Innovation is inherently philosophical. Nearly every useful definition of innovation consists of two parts: a highlight of what is “new,” “novel” or “fresh,” and the second part nearly always points to  “added value” to some group of people. When “value” is discussed, the conversation turns necessarily to philosophy – What is value? Value towards what…

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My Flourishing is Inextricably Linked to Yours

By: on January 21, 2020

It was a cold Minnesota Saturday and local Mohican faith leader, Jim Bear Jacobs, had joined a delegation that I was facilitating in order to challenge our dominant culture understanding of Scripture, Christian faithfulness, and restorative leadership.  During the conversation, he brought up the commodification of land by white, European settlers.  Referencing what some would…

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A Call To Relevant And Adaptive Leadership.

By: on January 20, 2020

We live in a world where we have come to recognize that change is the only constant. This is so much so in what we have come to call “The secular world” or secular2 in Charles Taylor’s definition[1], change has become unpredictable because it happens too fast. In such an environment, and especially today when…

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Requiem of Urban Tales of Secularism

By: on January 19, 2020

Moving to the Bay Area in July 2019, was provocative and exhilarating. The accepted assignment to undertake was a role as Young Adults/Discipleship pastors within a 17–year church with a congregation of millennials full of hope and potential eager to evangelize to the people of their broken region. Of course, being an evangelist at heart,…

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The Wind and the Waves

By: on January 19, 2020

Hockey was big in my family, as was soccer (of course, I mean British Football). Tuesday and Thursday mornings every week my brother and I were up before school for hockey practise. In the evenings after school, when we weren’t at soccer practise, we were playing ball hockey and shooting pucks in our driveway. When…

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Of Whips and Table Flipping  

By: on January 19, 2020

In the Gospel of John, we read of a story that many of us are familiar with: The cleansing of the temple by Jesus.  John writes:   When it was almost time for the Jewish Passover, Jesus went up to Jerusalem. In the temple courts he found people selling cattle, sheep and doves, and others sitting at…

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The Economy of Grace

By: on January 19, 2020

As I read through Polyani’s The Great Transformation, words shared by Lord Glasman during our London/Oxford Advance kept resurfacing in my mind. He shared these words as he tried to explain the circumstances that predicated Brexit in the UK: “You think you’re acting in an altruistic way, but it’s really about self-interest in the end.”…

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The Spin of All Shades

By: on January 19, 2020

In a lot of ways, the secular world wants the same thing as the emergent Christian world. There is just a difference in finding the answer. A philosopher and out-spoken atheist, Richard Rorty, once wrote: “My sense of the holy is bound up with the hope that some day my remote descendants will live in…

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Thankfully There Are Those Who Can Do What I Cannot

By: on January 18, 2020

Ted Smith describes Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age book as preeminently a reference book for the academy with prodigious references that can be understood only by people whose range of engaging philosophy, theology, sociology, and literature can match Taylor’s range and scope. Fortunately, James K.A. Smith has helped us all to engage Taylor’s work by…

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What Would Taylor Say: Vocation, the Reformation, and Secular Humanism

By: on January 17, 2020

It’s hard to study the work of vocation without taking into consideration the deep fundamental shifts that took place during the Protestant Reformation. Luther, in his attempt to alter the “speeds”[1] or freedom[2] with which faith was exercised, ended up inspiring a reformation of faith. Luther succeeded at this Reformation while many before him had…

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Entertainment or Internal Longing?

By: on January 17, 2020

Our American culture seems to have a fascination with the supernatural, the other-world. Whether vampires, zombies, fairies, or superheroes, Hollywood and much of the media continues to produce stories for us to be enchanted by. Even as I write this post Maleficent is playing on the screen in the airplane. The trailer says, “A vengeful…

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A Secular Age or Emergence Christianity

By: on January 17, 2020

Charles Taylor’s massive treatise on secularism, A Secular Age, seeks to explain the shift in our belief system which focuses on the conditions of belief; “The shift to secularity in this sense consists, among other things, of a move from a society where belief in God is unchallenged and indeed, unproblematic, to one in which…

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Released into the Wild

By: on January 17, 2020

Even before I was a pastor, I had a pastor’s heart. This has meant that when friends wrestled with faith, I wrestled with how to care for them through the journey. I’ve wondered at how to both create room for their questions while wrestling with why the answers that satisfied me, didn’t satisfy them. I’ve…

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Secularism but not as we know it

By: on January 16, 2020

How (Not) to Be Secular is “a book about a book”.[1] It is a slight book because it pales in size to the monumental work it attempts to interpret. It is an introduction, a summary, and short commentary, or perhaps a ‘literary butler’ guiding the unitiated through the intellectual history of secular modernity found in…

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Disenchanted Church

By: on January 16, 2020

Charles Taylor seems to stand alone in his evaluation of what is wrong in our human condition, more specifically in the West. Once cherished values, which many say are responsible for human flourishing, are no longer held. It is not difficult to point out the cause of moral decay in society: increasing divorce rates, normalization…

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Lowering (or Eliminating) the Bar

By: on January 16, 2020

A Secular Age is a book I did not know I needed. I am indebted to James K. A. Smith for making it accessible through How (Not) to Be Secular, especially given the time constraints of this assignment. As Dr. Clark hinted at, I did find myself in the secularism story and have garnered more thoughts…

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