DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

gorillas, penguins and turtles

By: on March 5, 2021

It is difficult to listen to someone who is pushing an opinion that does not fit with one’s own worldview or, be it, one’s own preferred way-of-seeing. Michael Shellenberger, acclaimed environmental activist, a recovered vegetarian and proponent of nuclear energy, is the author of the book ‘Apocalypse Never’. The book, though chalk-full of reference notes…

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Snappy Slogans and Conversation Stoppers

By: on March 4, 2021

In the introduction to his book, “Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All,” Michael Shellenberger says that he wrote the book “because the conversation about climate change and the environment has, in the last few years, spiraled out of control.”[1] His general thesis is that extremist activists, organizations, and efforts can actually do more…

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Steady On

By: on March 2, 2021

When we die, we want to believe our time here on this earth was worth something, that we had a purpose and made a difference. In Apocalypse Never, Michael Shellenberger notes, “…secular people are attracted to apocalyptic environmentalism because it meets the same psychological and spiritual needs as Judeo-Christianity and other religions. Apocalyptic environmentalism gives…

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Fear, Alone

By: on March 1, 2021

Dorothy Day, in her earlier years an anarchist, in her memoir ‘A Long Loneliness’, often references the thought and political ideologies of 18th Century socialist revolutionary, Karl Marx. She reflects with a surprising tenderness on ‘the Marxist slogan, “Workers of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains.’1 She felt connected to…

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Sound the Alarms

By: on March 1, 2021

When you think of alarms, what do you think of? At first glance, perhaps it’s that dreaded morning “wake up alarm” when your phone sounds off like death siren screaming at the top of its lungs at you. Maybe you think of an alarm as a warning of something bad is about to happen. We…

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A Word of Caution to the Alarmists

By: on March 1, 2021

In blending together research data, policy analysis, and learnings from a rich history of environmental justice movements, Michael Shellenberger makes a compelling and surprising argument for why the environmentalists are hurting more than helping.[1]  Put simply, he argues in Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All that the important work of environmentalism is being…

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Apocalypse Never: Can Eco-Theolgy Help?

By: on March 1, 2021

In the book Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All, the author Michael Shellenberger, a self-proclaimed environmental activist, tries to bring a voice of reason to an emotional explosive topic. His desire is to not only protect the environment but obtain what he states as “universal prosperity for all people.” He believes all scientists…

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Generosity and Curiosity

By: on March 1, 2021

Discovering and uncovering the driving questions of leaders and thinkers fascinate me. Behind most divisive topics usually lies a driving question best attributed to the fields of philosophy, ethics, and religion. Here I will make a brief argument broadly for the arena of underlying questions, then specifically through the issue of environmentalism with the artifact…

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Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?

By: on February 25, 2021

Doris Kearns Goodwin closes her book, “Leadership in Turbulent Times,” with a chapter called, “Of Death and Remembrance.” She spends a few pages on each of the presidents featured in her book writing about the circumstances of their leaving the presidency and the impact their term had on the nation. Two of the presidents profiled…

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Legacy: A Life of Impact

By: on February 24, 2021

Each individual, in one sense or another, wants to leave a legacy. They want to put their signature stamp on the future and impact generations to come. Some do it consciously, some unconsciously. We all want our lives to matter. We hope that in some small way we make a difference to those around us.…

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The Cloud of Witnesses

By: on February 23, 2021

At Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s funeral service, Franz Hildebrandt recalled a conversation he had with Bonhoeffer: “Why should it always have to be the bad people who make the revolutions?”[1] The word “revolution” carries with it many connotations. For Americans, we may think of the American Revolution and the spirit of nationalism it evokes as cries of…

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The Fall

By: on February 23, 2021

On July 22, 1943, with the country in shambles, struggling under the weight of war and horrific economic downfall, Mussolini received word from members of his Grand Council that he was to resign his position immediately and that the State would take over all governing affairs. Mussolini deferred response until the Grand Council meeting on…

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Driving Questions

By: on February 22, 2021

In my recent leadership reflections, I’ve become convinced that leaders get out of bed not to primarily further a cause, but to answer a question. While multiple questions persist and exist, there’s one that tends to hold the rest in orbit. It gnaws, focuses, and drives the leader. For Frederick Douglass, the question began with…

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Bonhoeffer & Leadership: A Chronology of Commitments

By: on February 22, 2021

In the very moment when Swiss theologian Karl Barth asserted that Christianity was separated “as by an abyss from the inherent godlessness of National Socialism,” Germany was working to fuse the German Volk (people) with the German Kirche (church).[1] Embedded within Hitler’s masterplan for domination was a strategy to make the violent rule of the…

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Peasant of the Pavements

By: on February 21, 2021

Dorothy Day was a passionate advocate for the oppressed. Her book, ‘A Long Loneliness’, depicts her as strong, intelligent and never alone in the cause. Community was an essential living modality for Dorothy. Her style was not ‘lone ranger’ rather, she seems to have been a contemplative with regards to key partnerships and intentional collaboration.…

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Mussolini: Commander in Chief (June 1940-January 1943)

By: on February 20, 2021

Delusional, stubborn, determined, dreaming only of seeing Fascist glory on the battlefield.   Outdated military, scant troops and supplies, accurate information withheld from Il Duce out of fear of punishment- Italy struggled at war’s onset.   Intertwined and tangled relations with Germany, the love affair with Hitler endured despite Italy’s military defeats. Positional survival now…

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The Visionary Leadership of LBJ and MLK

By: on February 17, 2021

There are moments when a leader whose vision, positional authority, relationships, and style all converge to accomplish something that seemed to be impossible. Such moment emerged as Lyndon Johnson stepped into the presidency following the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November 1963. While the country was reeling emotionally from Kennedy’s death, it still faced…

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Travel: An Antidote to Prejudice

By: on February 17, 2021

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” – Mark Twain Malcolm X to Mecca. Diedrich Bonhoeffer to Harlem. And Frederick Douglass to Ireland.…

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The Beginning of Life

By: on February 17, 2021

On April 8, 1945, Dietrich Bonhoeffer was taken by two men to be led to his execution. He had been asked to perform a final service on Quasimodo Sunday – the Sunday following Easter. One of his fellow prisoners, Payne Best, describes the scene: “He had hardly finished his last prayer when the door opened…

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Lodestar: A Guiding Light

By: on February 16, 2021

Like many others, I have always been fascinated by the stars. It is a nightly ritual to gaze into the night sky when I lock up our home for the day. As a youngster I was raised in the country on a small ranch at the base of Mount Jumbo outside of Missoula Montana. It…

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