DMINLGP

DMin, Leadership and Global Perspectives: Crafting Ministry in an Interconnected World

What COVID-19 May Be Telling Us About Us

By: on April 1, 2020

In a phone call with a faith leader this morning, we discussed the “Jobian” feel of the COVID-19 pandemic. Reflecting together on the life of Job, we wondered about suffering and how this might be the first moment in modern history where suffering is the simultaneously shared experience of the entire world. We discussed the…

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Taringa Whakarongo (Let Your Ears Listen)

By: on April 1, 2020

Te timatanga o te matauranga ko te wahangu, te wahanga tuarua ko te whakarongo. The first stage of learning is silence, the second stage is listening. [1] Culture is meaningful. I have observed a culture of leadership, specifically of the Christian ilk, that seems to be quite fearful at its root. Hierarchy and a striving…

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Don’t Do As I do; Do as I say

By: on April 1, 2020

I learned as a parent that things are more often caught than taught. As a child, when I asked my Dad “why?”, his response was usually “because I said so!” Though this was never a satisfactory answer I did understand it was his way of saying he was the boss. Every parent learns there is…

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The De Facto R&D Branch of Christianity

By: on March 31, 2020

There is something almost magical about the ages of 18 to 24. So many of life’s biggest decisions are made during that time. How people are impacted during that season will affect them for the rest of their lives. I’ve given my adult life thus far to this age group, and I love the potential…

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Life is Like a Clock

By: on March 31, 2020

Life is like a clock It has an exterior seen by people And an interior filled with gears.   The clock has a function. How well it functions depends on the gears contained within and how well they work together.   Faith is one of those gears. So is God and Jesus and Spirit and…

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Investing in Spiritual Development While Sheltering in Place

By: on March 31, 2020

I was having a conversation with the student ministries director of my church yesterday. As our church has followed CDC and local recommendations regarding large group gatherings, he has had to be resourceful in fulfilling his responsibilities. The students have met together through Zoom in place of their regular Sunday evening activities, but he said…

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Finding Our Foundation

By: on March 30, 2020

The issue of morality is one that each of us wrestles with throughout our lives.  Where does morality come from?  Why was it wrong for Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit?  Why was it considered evil for Cain to murder Abel?  Why is it wrong to steal the Hershey’s bar from the gas…

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Youth and politic a challenge

By: on March 30, 2020

It’s very interesting how politics are still something young people show little interest in. In his last chapter 5, Smith eludes this vital topic of “Civic and political disengagement”. It is nothing new to know that the percentage of young people who are involved in decisions regarding government policies is very small. Few have been the times…

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You’re Gonna Serve Somebody

By: on March 27, 2020

OH NO! A Ramone’s song just came back to me! “I don’t wanna grow up…”[1] A brief note about our social science authors from their bio’s: Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society at the University of Notre Dame.…

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Dreaming About a Better World…

By: on March 25, 2020

My heart is broken this week as I come face-to-face with so much grief and disillusionment.  Working as a Hospice Chaplain and Bereavement Director has been an overwhelming adventure during these trying times.  Patients are dying, but people cannot come together to grieve.  This crisis has flipped the world upside down with regards to helping…

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Democracy, Identity, and Equity is a Mirage in Africa

By: on March 24, 2020

During the late 19th century and early 20th century, there was a scramble for Africa colonization by the different European countries. The British, French, Italians, Portuguese, Germans, and Spanish took over various parts of Africa and exploited them well. They came established the development they had founded in their countries, which they knew would not…

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Looking at a Distorted Mirror

By: on March 23, 2020

Francis Fukuyama is one of my favourite writers in the world of Identity and socio-economic thinking; which, of course, means other people can’t stand his thinking at all. One Irish writer refers to him and an “intellectual Piñata”.[1] Fukuyama became prominent at the end of the 1980s because he displayed a degree of prescience regarding…

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Fukuyama Leaves Me Wanting More

By: on March 20, 2020

This past week has been very challenging, perhaps extremely distracting and dismaying, for all of us. For us here locally at the Vineyard Church of Houston, we held our first “COVID-19 Response” joint staff and Pastoral Council meeting (via Zoom) last Thursday evening, March 12. Since then, we have and continue to learn and share…

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Time for a National ‘Gut Check’

By: on March 20, 2020

This morning my husband and I looked again at the numbers: the COVID-19 count around the world. It is part of our new morning routine. We look for how our own nation is faring compared to other countries. This morning he had a hint of hope in his voice as he noted the increase wasn’t…

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The Rising of the Political Nones

By: on March 19, 2020

We are living in unprecedented times. There seems to be a general world wide malaise affecting everyone concerned about the coronavirus. It’s all what people talk about. In a week’s time we went from smiling at silly memes like “Throwback Thursdays” to pandemonium as if the world was coming to an end. Wherever one may…

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Zombies, Identity, and You

By: on March 19, 2020

In his book Identity Francis Fukuyama argues that much of the recent shift in politics in the world is a result of people feeling that they are not getting a proper amount of respect or that they feel invisible or humiliated by the world as they understand it. These two motivations have led to the…

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Creedal Identity and Gloriously Common Calling

By: on March 19, 2020

Francis Fukuyama’s Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment was a challenging assignment, given the situation the world is facing. I believe his premise has merit and is worth our attention but attention has been a scarce commodity. What a couple of weeks it has been. My fifteen year-old daughter realized and…

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What in the world are we doing together

By: on March 19, 2020

Reflecting on these two texts, I am focused upon the term ‘Ezer Kenegdo.’[1] The word Ezer Kenegdo is an old Hebrew term, but the purpose of discussion essentially means a strong warrior, a complimentary partner with the other half of the adam. I love the word complementary. Complementary is what one is and doing if they…

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The Shape of Identity

By: on March 19, 2020

Who am I? This question has always been and will always be the million-dollar question. Issues with identity are not anything new, but as Fukuyama points out, we might be in a new era of what is genuinely shaping people’s identity. In his book, Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, he…

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Identity Flux

By: on March 18, 2020

Continuing our semester study of the intersection between cultural movements and personal identity, Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment by Stanford Professor Francis Fukuyama is a tour de force of the history and current reality of identity politics.  The universal desire for recognition of one’s identity is a master concept that…

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