Cultural Celebration

Best. Event. Ever. OK, that might be a slight exaggeration, but the Cultural Fair in the Bruin Den on Tuesday was a lot of fun, and the food was incredible. International students set up table displays with information about their home countries. They also brought a delicious and dazzling array of dishes for students to sample.

Students received a “passport” at the entrance, which they took to the numerous tables. They had to figure out how to write “I love you” in the different languages represented.

The Cultural Fair was part of Cultural Celebration Week on campus, which is meant to inspire cross-cultural interaction between students, staff and faculty. On Monday, chapel speakers Ben Sand and Anthony Jordan – Portland Leadership Foundation Executives – spoke about “Stepping into Each Others World.” There was a Coffee and Culture meeting that evening. The Cultural Fair was Tuesday. On Wednesday, Ben and Anthony spoke at chapel again, which was followed by a Talk Back session. Joel Perez, the Dean of Transitions and Inclusion, spoke about “Reflecting the Diversity of God’s Kingdom at GFU” during an afternoon meeting. There was also a World’s Got Talent show in the WoodMar Theater. The Cultural House held and open house on Thursday, and the weekly Shalom gathering focused on spiritual formation and reconciliation.

Read More

Worms!

Clyde Thomas, the director of Plant Services here on campus, has worms. Lots of them. In fact, he’s got about 80 pounds of the creepy-crawlers right now, and his goal is to amass 3,000 pounds of these garbage-eating creatures.

The new vermicomposting program will serve two main purposes: First, food waste from Bon Appetit, the food service company at George Fox, will go into compost bins where the worms live. They feed on the leftover food, digest it and leave behind nutrient-rich castings (worm manure). Second, the castings will help fertilize the athletic fields, which will reduce the amount of synthetic chemicals, which will in turn reduce the university’s carbon footprint.

The worms get to feast, waste gets reduced and the fields get fertilized naturally. Win-win-win.

Thomas enlisted the help of George Fox students to help with the worm herding. About 20 compost bins will be placed around campus, each with about three pounds of worms. Every three months, worm populations can double. As the compost colony grows, Thomas will place them in larger bins until he reaches his desired 3,000 pounds, which should take about 18 months.

Thomas empties a bucket of compost and worms to separate them into smaller containers for students to place in bins located around campus.

(more…)

Read More