Student success: Focus on learning, not grades

IMG_8730(2)-2

RickMuthiah-2By Rick Muthiah, Associate Director of Learning Support Services

I frequently meet with students who express high anxiety over test taking, either because they have difficulty learning course content or because they experience a mental block when they sit down to take the test. Our conversation generally winds its way to one of my most repeated phrases: focus on learning, not on grades. I drive home this point with any individual or group I meet with to talk about academic success. Whether on tests, papers, homework or projects, I practically beg students to exert their effort on the learning process and to let go of any fixation on grades. A funny thing happens for those who invest in learning – they generally end up with good grades, too. Conversely, students can get an A in a class without learning much from the course.

What does it look like to focus on learning? Let’s start with a commonly repeated formula that suggests that students should spend two hours out of class for every hour in class. To be frank, most college students aren’t spending sufficient time on learning activities once they leave class; they are spending about one hour out of class for every hour in class – half the recommended time. This standard will certainly fluctuate based on course demands and time of semester, yet a survey of students at my institution indicated that 70 percent spent 15 hours or less per week preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, analyzing data, rehearsing and other academic activities). Given that a full-time course load is 12 to 18 hours of class per week, many students are skimping on learning activities.
(more…)

Read More

College visit tips: Slow down and stay awhile

IMG_5605-2

Lindsay Peterson-2By Lindsay Knox, Director of Undergraduate Admissions

I am an efficiency-driven person. I like things to be neat, clear-cut and quick. Recently we welcomed a family to our campus and they were my kind of people. We were their third campus visit of the day and they were on their way to a fourth. They had planned down to the minute how long they could spend on each campus tour and exactly what time they needed to be pulling out of the parking lot to make it to the next destination. This family had the college visit system down to a slick and organized operation, and the efficient person in me admired their “get-it-done” attitude.

However, as they walked away from our office and on to their last visit of the day, I couldn’t help but feel like for all they had accomplished in their day they had missed out on so much.

(more…)

Read More

Worship with Passion

IMG_8233

By Devon Halvorson (Class of 2017)

Recently my friends and I had the opportunity to see Kristian Stanfill and the Passion Worship Band perform on campus. Passion is a band, and also a conference, that travels around the country, encouraging student through worship and prayer. We were lucky enough to have them stop by George Fox and share in a night filled with music, dancing and prayer.

The night really began when the band started playing, lights began to flash, and students rushed to the front of the stage to dance and worship. The music was great and it was fun to see not only Fox students, but also other members of the Newberg community worshiping together. It was an awesome night shared among classmates and friends.
(more…)

Read More

Internships: The key to connecting students to the world of work

Deb Mumm-Hill-2By Deb Mumm-Hill, Director of Student Success

So, what is the employment outlook for young adults? The good news for college students is economic forecasts indicate 66 percent of jobs in 2018 will require a post-secondary degree. The tough news is industry needs specific skills to go along with the diploma, so a degree with no industry experience makes it difficult to land a job within a specific degree area.

In the 1980s, industry hired large groups of recent college graduates with very little work experience and invested in three- to six-month training programs that prepared young hires to hit the ground running. In return for this investment, the expectation was that employees would stay with the organization 10 to 20 years as they aspired to climb the corporate ladder. Times have changed in an era with tight corporate budgets. Managers now realize it is not a wise investment of resources to train a millennial employee who only stays 18 to 36 months before moving on to a new company. So how can colleges and industry more wisely prepare the millennial for the world of work?
(more…)

Read More

Information on Griffin Huber celebration of life service

Photo by Chelsea Smith
Photo by Chelsea Smith
Pastor Mark Pratt-Russum of West Hills Friends Church asked that we share the following information with the George Fox community. Please contact Associate Pastor of Christian Leadership Jamie Johnson (jejohnson@georgefox.edu) with any questions.

***

Dear Friends,

We would love you to join us to celebrate the life of Griffin Huber. We will gather at Southwest Bible Church (14605 SW Weir Road, Beaverton, OR 97007) Saturday, Sept. 20 at 11:00 a.m. There will be some food available following the service.
(more…)

Read More

My Serve Day Experience

IMG_8518By Heather Kurtz, Class of 2015

Serve Day is one of my favorite times at George Fox. Every year, we dedicate an entire day to serve others around our community. Students, professors and faculty come together and work to bless others, and in my case this year, to be blessed by others too.

Three of my friends and I partnered with a team leader and Faith in Action (a local non-profit organization) to help seniors in their homes for the day. The tasks we did for these people included washing windows, cleaning carpets, weeding and hooking up a TV. We helped three individuals, and all three were so appreciative and friendly, but Marilyn stood out most to me this year. When we were weeding her garden, she chose to stay outside and talk with us while we worked, telling us stories about her kids. It was nice to serve her with our actions, but also through conversation.
(more…)

Read More

Student Success Story: Arturo Lucatero

IMG_7678Senior computer science major Arturo Lucatero won’t graduate from George Fox University until May, but that didn’t stop him from lining up his dream job with one of the most recognized companies in the world: Microsoft.

This summer, Lucatero, an Act Six scholarship recipient, will begin work as a program manager at the company’s world headquarters in Redmond, Wash., where his duties will include testing consumer products to ensure a user-friendly experience. “One of my favorite parts of my job is that I become the face of the customer,” he says.

Recently we sat down with Lucatero to learn more about his new job and his time at George Fox.

Q: I understand you’ve already got a job lined up after college. Tell me what the position is and how it came about?
A: I will be working for Microsoft as a program manager on their business intelligence team. Growing up, it was my dream to work at Microsoft. After arriving at Fox, I pursued an internship with [the company], and though it didn’t initially work out, I managed to land an internship with Intel. Still, my dream was to be a Microsoft intern. One of the things I learned was that Microsoft prefers computer science majors as interns, so I switched from information systems to a computer science major. Thanks to that, I was able to be a Microsoft Explorer intern last summer [2013]. It really helped me decide what I wanted to do, which is program management, so this summer I went back as a program manager intern working on a self-service business intelligence project.
(more…)

Read More

ADP Graduate Success Story: Jim Ferraris

FerrarisDegree: Bachelor of Arts in Management and Organizational Leadership (2013)
Current position: Deputy Chief of Police, Salem Police Department

How would you describe your experience at George Fox?

My experience at George Fox was outstanding! The George Fox motto is “Be Known.” That was so true – I was known at George Fox. I have a busy life, both professionally and personally. Staff and faculty did everything they could to make furthering my education workable within the demands on my life. Several professors and instructors stand out. To name a few: Frank Barsotti taught human resources. He was a perfect fit. He has years of experience working for HP as a global HR director, responsible for more than 30,000 employees. I learned a lot from him that I am able to apply in my professional life. Carol Hutchinson was another fabulous instructor. From a spirituality perspective she helped me grow as an individual. Dr. George Byrtek was another great professor. He shepherded us through the MGOL program, always was available to us and pushed us to be better.
(more…)

Read More

A three-step guide for student-athletes in the college search process

Taylor-Martin-2By Taylor Martin
Assistant Director of Athletic Recruiting

As I was touring my first campus during my junior year of high school, I was aware of the classroom experience, the dorms and the cafeteria, but if I’m being honest I was mostly thinking about my appointment with the coach that concluded my visit.

“How much should I talk?”
“Should I brag or be humble?”
“What questions should I ask?”
“Will he like me?”
“Will I make my shots in open gym afterwards?”

All of these questions swirled in my head and distracted me from really allowing myself the space to feel comfortable on that first visit. This one visit was a pretty good reflection of how too many student-athletes (including myself!) go through the entire college selection process. With that said, there is a better way to determine where to go, and it all comes down to how much work you are willing to put in on the front end.
(more…)

Read More

How to stay organized during the college search process

IMG_8703-2By Ryan Dougherty
Executive Director of Admissions, George Fox University

Before beginning the college search in earnest, plan ahead. Mailboxes fill with brochures and emails start coming and before long you can be overwhelmed by the volume and breadth of information. One of the most important things a family can do is to have a plan. For simplicity’s sake, here are a few practical tips to stay organized in the areas of mail, email and schedules:

Dealing with Mail
The first college brochure you receive will likely feel like a special occasion; the hundreds that follow may not elicit the same response. A simple way to stay organized is to discuss your criteria for college selection early and then create “yes,” “no” and “maybe” piles. When the mailperson delivers, immediately separate your college brochures into one of these piles. For clarification, your “no” pile should be the recycle bin. Trust me, the volume of mail will be significant. Keep the “yes” pile to a limited quantity and go through your “maybe” pile regularly. Plan early and stick with the plan.
(more…)

Read More